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Harry C. LaBonde, Jr., PE, Director 
6920 Yellowtail Rd, Cheyenne, WY 82002 
Phone: 307-777-7626 

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2004 LEGISLATIVE REPORT
CHAPTER 4. Statistical Information
Project Reports

A typical water development project proceeds through the following levels, however, some levels may be bypassed if there is pertinent existing information available on the project.

1. Level I, Reconnaissance Studies

These studies are preliminary analyses and include a comparison of alternatives.

The typical Level I study should identify or provide the following:

a. Identify development options.

b. Identify potential beneficiaries and benefits of each option.

c. Describe factors that could impair or prohibit the development of any option, including legal and environmental constraints.

d. Analyze water rights, including identification of conflicting prior rights.

e. Compare options based on physical and legal water availability, technical, economic, legal and environmental considerations.

2. Level II, Feasibility Studies

The typical Level II study consists of two phases. During Phase 1 project feasibility is addressed. If the project is determined feasible the proposal is advanced to Phase 2, where it is refined to the status necessary for a Level III funding request.

The typical Level II, Phase I investigations should include the following activities:

a. A qualification of the amount of water that can physically and legally be developed.

b. A determination of the water needs that could be served by the project.

c. A determination of the technical feasibility including a safety analysis.

d. The development of a general configuration depicting preliminary physical characteristics of the project.

e. The development of a preliminary project operation plan.

f. An estimation of costs for construction, consultant services, and operation and maintenance.

g. An identification of direct benefits that could result from project implementation.

h. An identification of costs and benefits that would result by incorporating recreation, fish, and wildlife, hydropower, and flood control functions into the project.

i. A definition of economic, legal, environmental, and administrative problems and the identification of alternate solutions to those problems.

j. The development of an ownership map of lands that may be affected by the project.

k. The collection of data to identify environmental impacts and potential mitigation and enhancement opportunities.

l. The inclusion an analysis of the project sponsor's ability to pay. After the above information has been provided and reviewed, the technical, economic, and legal feasibility will be considered by the Commission. This consideration, coupled with the sponsor's need for the project, interest in the project, and willingness and ability to financially participate, will be the factor used to determine if the project should proceed to Level II, Phase II.

The typical Level II, Phase II investigations should include the following activities: a. Technical design which includes:

i. Hydrologic investigations,

ii. An operating plan which addresses water management during and after construction, and

iii. A conceptual design of the general project configuration.

b. The identification of state and federal permits and clearances necessary to construct the project.

c. Performance of an environmental analysis of the proposed operation and configuration. On the more complex projects the Wyoming Game and Fish Department assists the WWDC in these analyses. The WWDC contracts with the Game and Fish Department on an as needed basis to provide environmental baseline data, evaluate project impacts, and recommend mitigation measures.

d. Performance of a cultural resource survey of the general project area, as applicable.

e. Determination of lands that must be acquired to implement the project. Including applications to purchase or obtain easements on public lands, and appraisals of lands that must be acquired.

f. The development of a detailed schedule of the activities necessary to complete the project.

g. Preparation of an itemized project budget, including costs for design engineering, permitting, land acquisition, environmental mitigation, construction, construction engineering, operation, maintenance and replacement.

h. Performance of an economic analysis comparing the allocated costs with project primary and secondary benefits. For the more complex projects an analysis of indirect benefits may be appropriate.

3. Level III, Final Design and Construction

The typical Level III project includes the following:

a. Preparation of the project agreement, note and mortgage that formalizes sponsor and WWDC project responsibilities and which defines the financing plan/procedures. Funds are not available for expenditure until these documents are executed.

b. Securing consultant services required for final design, permitting, and construction inspection.

c. The preparation of permit applications.

d. The preparation of Environmental Impact Statements or Assessments. Typically, the 404 permit application will trigger this activity.

e. Preparation of the construction documents including technical specifications, contract documents and bidding plans. This work may be performed concurrently with the premitting process if it is determined that the project feasibility will not be impacted by permit conditions. If there are particularly sensitive permitting issues, this task should be postponed until those issues are successfully resolved.

f. The acquisition of options on or title to the necessary project lands and easements. The scheduling of this task should be sequenced to minimize impacts to property owners and as dictated by the permitting process.

g. The compilation of mitigation measures to address impacts on environmental and cultural resources.

h. Preparation of the advertisement for bids.

i. Construction review and monitoring services.

j. The determination of the date the sponsor accrues project benefits in order to establish loan repayment schedules.

k. The initiation of project acceptance and completion procedures.


Active Projects

 01. PROJECT:Aladdin Water Supply
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Aladdin Community Water District
LOCATION:Crook County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 10 1994 I $25,000 1996
Level II 8 1995 I $275,000 1996
Level II 15 1996 I Hold 1998
Level II 82 1998 I Hold 2000
Level III 16 1999 I N/A N/A

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The WWDC completed a Level I study in 1994 which identified a well site and developed cost estimates and monthly rates that were acceptable to district members. The water district requested that WWDC proceed to Level II to construct a Madison test well and develop conceptual level plans for storage and transmission components.

A Level II study was completed in 1995, that identified the location of a good groundwater supply. During the Level II process the project service area was reduced to the immediate Aladdin area, which included fourteen (14) taps. Conceptual level designs and cost estimates were completed for the downsized system. The total Level III project cost was estimated at $335,000, which included the Level II well costs ($80,000), the transmission system ($235,000), and the distribution and chlorination systems ($20,000). The distribution and chlorination systems were not eligible for WWDC participation.

Pending construction of the project, the well will be maintained in state ownership and provisions were made to allow sale of water to the district and to the Department of Transportation. Water will be sold to the district for $1.20 per 1000 gallons and to the Department of Transportation for $.50 per 1000 gallons. No appropriation is necessary because the well is already in place. This authorization will allow the state to eventually recoup its investment in the well, and the well will be put to beneficial use.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required.


 02. PROJECT:Albin Transmission Lines
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:Town of Albin, Incorporated Municipality
LOCATION:Laramie County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 7 2002 II $160,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The 2003 Level II Test Well and Master Plan Study recommended several schedules for upgrades, additions, and improvements to the Town of Albin water supply system. The Town is presently requesting Level III construction funding assistance for the first priority phase, including rehabilitation of the Station Well and the Albin No. 1 Well, replacement of a 6" transmission line from the Station Well to the 100,000 gallon elevated storage tank, and a new cross-connecting segment of 8" transmission line that will feed from the Albin No. 4 Well. WWDC funding for rehabilitation work on the Station Well will be contingent on acquisition of the well from Union Pacific Railroad.

Estimated Level III
Phase 1 Costs: 
Design$ 37,264
  
Phase 2 Costs: 
Mobilization, Bonds, Insurance$ 26,780
Pipeline, Fittings, Valves$109,810
Well Rehab$ 58,000
Electrical$ 7,500
Boring$ 20,700
Surfacing, Revegetation$ 36,860
Traffic Control$ 5,822
Quality Control Testing$ 5,822
Unlisted Items$ 23,287
Permitting$ 5,000
Easements$ 138
Legal$ 5,000
Engineering (10%)$ 29,458
Contingency (15%)$ 48,606
Total Project Costs$420,047
Rounded$430,000

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be incorporated into the Rehabilitation Program at Level III with an appropriation of $215,000 (50% Grant).


 03. PROJECT:Albin Water Supply Rehabilitation
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:Town of Albin, Incorporated Municipality
LOCATION:Laramie County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 7 2002 II $160,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The 2003 Level II Albin Water Master Plan Study recommends an extension and budget increase for continuation of test drilling for emplacement of a new municipal well. The test drilling conducted earlier this year installed seven (7) pilot wells at various locations in and near town. Test drilling revealed unexpected complexities in the Arikaree and Ogallala Formations that resulted in varied yet mostly deficient yield potential. One location immediately west of town was discovered to have suitable production characteristics for siting a production-size municipal well. The town is requesting additional Level II funding to complete test drilling with two (2) more pilot holes and a production-size test well.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be continued in the Rehabilitation Program at Level II with an appropriation of $140,000.


 04. PROJECT:Alpine Raw Water
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Town of Alpine
LOCATION:Lincoln County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 86 2001 II $40,000 2002
Level III 88 2002 I $41,700 2006

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Town of Alpine would like to move forward with the design to both the improvements to Little Jenny Lake Spring area and the raw water irrigation system that was recommended in the Level II study completed in October 2001.

The applicant requests funding to finance the first phase of a two-phase construction project. Phase 1 also includes engineering design and specifications for the second phase. Phase I also addressed permitting and mitigation work, legal fees and rights-of-way issues. Phase II would include constructing improvements to the spring area and installation of the irrigation system.

Phase II of the project was approved by 2002 Legislature. The field work is complete and negotiations with the U.S. Forrest Service and WYDOT are underway. This phase should be complete in early 2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required.


 05. PROJECT:Alta Master Plan
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:Targhee Town Water District
LOCATION:Teton
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 7 2002 II $50,000 2004
Level II 125 2003 II $166,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The sponsor is requesting additional Level II funding to continue a ground water supply testing program. The original ground water testing and development plan is described in the 2002 WWDC Level I Alta Master Plan Study. This plan was intended to be the scope for the Level II Study. However, due to the information collected after the Level I Study was completed and after consultation with the sponsor, the testing and development plan has been altered. Concerns were raised by the sponsor because of sediment production at the existing site. Concerns were also raised that seasonal low groundwater levels could compromise the production capacity of the existing facilities. Fieldwork conducted in 2003, as recommended in the Level I Study, consisted of diagnostic testing (geophysical logs, video log, spinner survey, and flow testing) of the existing Targhee Towne wells and flow testing of two neighboring wells.

It is recommended that the study be extended from rehabilitation and expansion of existing source supply at the location of the two existing Targhee Towne wells, to an evaluation of ground water development opportunities at alternative sites. An extension of time and additional funding is being requested to provide an evaluation of potential groundwater development sites where groundwater level fluctuations can be better accommodated and where sediment production problems may be less. Successful development of an additional well outside the present well field may also provide valuable operational redundancy. The increased budget provides for an alternative test well siting evaluation and two (2) pilot test wells at Alta for the Targhee Town Water District.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be continued in the Rehabilitation Program at Level II with an appropriation of $65,000.


 06. PROJECT:Antelope Valley Water Supply
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Antelope Valley Improvement & Service District
LOCATION:Campbell County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level III 28 1994 II $850,000 1997
Level III 96 2000 II $102,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
Antelope Valley has purchased Well No. 5, emplaced by WWDC in 1999, and is in process of making improvements to their water system as delineated in the 1999 Level II study. Construction tasks include; 1) Install pump, well house, appurtenances at Well No. 5 and, 2) Install chlorine feed system at storage site.

The Level II study was a combined project that included analysis of Antelope Valley and Crestview Estates subdivisions. These projects were advanced to Level III in 2000. The legislation approving the projects required an agreement between Antelope Valley and Crestview prior to starting construction. This agreement was completed in 2002. The project has been advertised for bids and should complete in 2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required.


 07. PROJECT:Baggs Water Supply/Baggs Master Plan
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Town of Baggs
LOCATION:Carbon County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 36 2000 I $50,000 2002
Level III 2 2001 II $92,000 2005
Level I 7 2002 I $40,000 2004
Level III 125 2003 II $28,000 2005

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The residents of the Town of Baggs utilize treated water from a Little Snake River intake diversion. High turbidity counts (NTU'S) during spring runoff have plagued the town in the form of drinking water standard exceedences. Because of the water quality violation, the town applied to explore groundwater options.

The Level II study of the existing water supply and treatment system was completed as a continuance of the WWDC Groundwater Grant study awarded the town in 1999. The purpose of the study was to investigate alternative diversion systems, utilizing results of 1999 test well drilling, and prepare conceptual designs, cost estimates, economic analysis, and project financing guidelines for funding opportunities.

The Level I Master Plan, authorized in 2002, is a continuation of water projects currently underway. The projects are funded by the WWDC and the USDA Rural Utility Service. The project will replace the Town's infiltration gallery and upgrade the water treatment plant.

The Master Plan included mapping, provided an evaluation of the water supply and distribution system, and developed a maintenance and replacement schedule for the water mains. The plan recommended increasing the size of the mains and adding 100,000 gallons of storage to meet fire suppression needs. If the town's system is to be expanded beyond the city limits, a regional system that extends to Dixon should be examined. There is no direct line from the water treatment plant to the storage tank. A direct line to the tank would fill the tank quicker and improve water pressures throughout the system. The water system losses observed in 2000 seem to be due to un-metered taps on the system. A program should be undertaken to eliminate the unmetered taps.

Plans and specifications for the Level III construction project have been prepared during 2002. The project was let for bids in August 2002. However, only one bid was received, and it exceeded the engineer's cost estimate by approximately $56,900.00. The SPONSOR and its Engineer recommended the bid be accepted. Due to the extreme drought conditions, it is imperative that this project be completed as soon as possible. The construction is continuing using local funds to make up the shortfall. However, this will create a burden on the Town's finances, therefore this funding increase will be used to reimburse the Town.

In 2003, the WWDC approved an additional $28,000 grant to cover approximately 50% of the cost overrun in the Level III project increasing it from $92,000 to $120,000.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends a new project be incorporated into the Level II New Development Program with an appropriation of $50,000. This Level II Study will evaluate storage needs, water lines, a possible raw water system and determine the potential to use raw water in lieu of drinking water for irrigating greenways and will evaluate the opportunity for regionalizing the Savery, Dixon and Baggs area for drinking water purposes.


 08. PROJECT:Bairoil Water Supply/Bairoil Master Plan
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Town of Bairoil
LOCATION:Carbon County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 81 1999 I $225,000   2000
Level II 36 2000 I $200,000   2002
Level III 96 2000 I $480,000* 2004
Level II 7 2002 I $ 40,000   2004
*60% grant

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Town of Bairoil is supplementing its municipal supply by developing an alternative groundwater supply to the Battle Springs Pipeline, which was originally operated by BP-Amoco, and by rehabilitating Abel Springs. BP-Amoco, sold the Lost Soldier Oil Field operations to Merit Energy, which is a significant portion of Bairoil's water supply. Merit Energy also uses water from the Battle Springs Pipeline. With 1999 WWDC Level II funds, a production-sized test well was drilled to improve Bairoil's water supply. Deep groundwater sources are difficult to find because of the variable aquifer supply available and widespread occurrence of uranium deposits, which adversely affect radionuclide levels. The town purchased the test well as a supply well and was granted an additional $200,000 Level II appropriation (Session 2000) to drill a second production well. The second supply well was completed during 2001, however its yield was significantly less than the first production well's design yield of 60 gpm.

The town subsequently decided not to purchase the second well and has completed design and construction on the transmission line to connect the first test well into the town's water system.

Remaining funds of the Level III 2000 appropriation are to be used to construct improvements to enhance flows derived from the original Abel Springs source.

The Level II study revealed that water consumption by the town far exceeds the normal demand by a town its size. A continued Level II study was authorized by the 2002 Legislature to prepare a master plan of the town's water system to include an audit of the town's transmission, storage, and distribution system, and to investigate additional sources of water supply at the Abel Springs.

The additional study work was completed in March 2003, concluding that significant distribution leaks exist in the system on the customer side of the service lines and recommending extension of the Abel Springs collector lateral lines.

An application for easement and improvements on the Town's spring source is currently under review by the BLM. The Sponsor is requesting a two-year extension of the reversion date until July 1, 2006 to allow adequate time to obtain the BLM permit and ensure that project components of the spring improvements are properly constructed and placed into operation.

The Sponsor is also requesting that the Project Description of the authorizing legislation be amended to include the deepening of an existing well within the Town, which is used to irrigate a park area and living snow fence. Deepening of the well is needed to improve the quality of the well for use in irrigation in order to eliminate up to 10 gpm of treated drinking water, which is currently supplementing the irrigation demands. The improvements to the well would also include the provision of a windmill power source. Well improvements are estimated to be approximately $20,000 and would come from excess project grant funds.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends that the reversion date be extended two years which would be July 1, 2006 to ensure that all project components are properly constructed and that the project description be amended to include well improvements on the existing town irrigation well.


 09. PROJECT:Basin Area Water Supply (formerly Manderson Water Supply/
Basin Gardens Water Project
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:South Big Horn County Water Supply Joint Powers Board
LOCATION:Big Horn County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level III-1 206 1995 I $670,000* 1999
Level III-1 59 1996 I $5,360,000* 1999
Level III-1 38 1998 I $200,000* 2002
Level III 69 2003 I $ 559,450* 2008
*67% grant

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The South Big Horn County Water Supply Joint Powers Board (SBHCWSJPB) was formed to serve as the sponsor for the project. The sponsor has 820 taps committed to the project.

A groundwater exploration program was conducted by the WWDC in 1985 that indicated a good potential exists for obtaining groundwater from the Paleozoic formations approximately 8 miles east of Manderson. In 1993, an exploratory well was constructed that produced water of excellent quality, but lacked sufficient yield to supply the projected 750 taps in the regional water system. In 1994 the well was hydraulically fractured in an attempt to stimulate water production. The well now flows approximately 350 gpm of good quality water. A second well has been drilled into the Madison formation that produces approximately 250 gpm. The water supply from the two wells will meet demand for many years.

The overall project delivers water from the well field located east of Manderson to the Town of Manderson, the South Big Horn County Water District and the Town of Basin. Three separate bid lettings have been conducted for the project. The first contract was for the second production well which has been drilled. The second construction contract provides the major transmission

pipeline between the wells and the towns of Basin and Manderson. The second phase is complete and customers are receiving water. The third phase construction of the rural distribution system is complete and in service.

Phase II and III construction is complete. Phase IV design and construction is complete. Phase IV consists of a pipeline which connects the regional system to the old water storage tanks at Manderson.

Basin Gardens is a rural area of Big Horn County on the east side of the Big Horn River, near the Town of Basin. The area was included in the original Basin Area Water Supply Project but lack of obligated taps precluded their participation when the original Basin Area Level III phase was approved (1999). An updated feasibility analysis for Basin Gardens was performed in the presently active Big Horn Regional Water Supply Level II Study of which SBHCWSJPB is a sponsoring entity. The number of taps in Basin Gardens, now meet the minimum WWDC criterion.

An engineering firm has been retained by the SBHCWSJPB to design this system, which will be integrated into the Big Horn Regional Joint Powers Board's system. Construction of the project should commence in 2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required.


 10. PROJECT:Basin Raw Water Pipeline
LEVEL:New Application
SPONSOR:Town of Basin, Incorporated Municipality
LOCATION:Big Horn
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
III 69 2003 II $ 202,000* 2002
*50% grant

PROJECT INFORMATION:
This project is to construct a raw water transmission supply line from the Big Horn River to the Town's reservoir. The project includes installing new pumps in the existing unused pump house at the Town's abandoned water treatment facility.

The pipeline would be used to supply domestic raw irrigation water for the Town of Basin during periods when the Big Horn canal is out of service. This includes early and late season when the canal is not flowing, as well as times when the canal is under repair. This project would also enable the town to maintain their water right in the Big Horn of 3.08 cfs.

Consulting Civil Engineers have been retained to design this system. Construction should commence during 2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required.


 11. PROJECT:Bedford Water Tank
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Bedford Water & Sewer District
LOCATION:Lincoln County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 15 1996 I $250,000** 1998
**The Bedford study was included in a regional study which incorporated the Town of Thayne, Bedford Water & Sewer District, and the Willow Creek Pipeline Company (now known as the Turnerville Water & Sewer District)

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Bedford system was designed and constructed in 1990. The main elements were the development of two springs, drilling a groundwater well and transmission and distribution piping. At that time a storage tank was included as an integral element to be included as system demand increased. The system has seen increases in demand and recent problems with one of the springs has resulted in taking it out of service. The increased storage capacity is now needed to meet peak demands within the system and allow the well and spring to operate at a regulated level.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be incorporated into the New Development Program at Level III with an appropriation of $500,000.


 12. PROJECT:Beulah Water Supply
LEVEL:I
SPONSOR:Beulah Water District
LOCATION:Crook County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 125 2003 I $40,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
Beulah is an unincorporated community located in extreme eastern Crook County along I-90. Residences are supplied by shallow wells along Sand Creek. Septic systems are suspected to be contaminating the alluvial aquifer after over 100 years of use. Most residents do not use their wells for potable supply. The District is interested in a central water supply system that would most likely be sourced from a deep well. The Madison Formation Aquifer is developed in this area for municipal and irrigation wells and would serve as an excellent supply for Beulah. This reconnaissance study is investigating the ground water supply option as well as transmission, storage, treatment, distribution components, and feasibility of implementation.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No further legislative action is required at this time.


 13. PROJECT:Big Horn Regional Joint Powers Board Pipeline
LEVEL:II/III
SPONSOR:Big Horn Regional Joint Powers Board
LOCATION:Big Horn, Washakie, Hot Springs Counties
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 36 2000 I $160,000 2002
Level II 86 2001 I $670,000 2002
Level III 88 2001 I $5,500,000 2007
Level II 7 2002 I $675,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
In December, 1996, the City of Worland's transmission Pipeline ruptured in a remote location, leaving Worland without potable water. Because of the remoteness of the rupture, this crisis lasted for about 10 days. The crisis revealed the vulnerability of other potable water systems in the region with remote water sources. Therefore, in 1999 the Big Horn Regional Steering Committee was organized to discuss ways to minimize the impact of future pipeline breaks. This committee evolved into the Big Horn Regional Joint Powers Board with the following objectives:

  • Route a second water transmission pipeline from the City of Worland's well field to Worland;
  • Connect the Town of Greybull's system to the Regional's system with a Greybull River crossing;
  • Explore means to support and enhance water supply to public water supply systems in rural and incorporated Hot Springs County; and,
  • Develop a southern-basin water supply well or well field.

The 2000 WWDC Level II Study by BRS Inc. completed an investigation of ground water potential for a municipal water supply in the southern Big Horn Basin. Eight (8) well sites were investigated within the southern Big Horn Basin that could potentially yield abundant (>500gpm), good quality (<500 mg/l TDS) water. These sites were chosen on the basis of geologic structure, drilling depths, geothermal gradient, distance from known geothermal activity, accessibility, and potential ground water quality. An extensive review of ground water data within the southern Big Horn Basin reveals that the most likely aquifer to yield abundant, good quality water is from the Paleozoic-age Madison-Big Horn Aquifer system. A secondary target aquifer, that is deemed viable in the study, is the Cambrian-age Flathead Sandstone.

A test well was completed in late 2001 at the Wild Horse Anticline site as a Madison-Big Horn Aquifer completion. Production yield at this site did not meet the requirements of the project. The original intent of ground water exploration in Hot Springs County was to establish a southern-basin well field capable of providing yield to match or exceed maximum daily use requirements of potential Hot Springs County users (including the Town of Thermopolis) and provide a supplemental supply to joint powers users to the north if and when needed. One well would not feasibly nor reliably provide this requirement just as envisioned for other source well field configurations serving the joint powers service area, i.e., the Worland well field (2 wells), Manderson well field (2 "Wild Horse" wells), and the Greybull supply wells (2 Trapper Creek wells and Shell Canyon well). The Wild Horse Anticline test well was not a success, however the Big Horn Rural Joint Powers Board wishes to pursue a second test well in Hot Springs County.

The continued Level II study includes exploration into the feasibility of expanding joint powers service area in Big Horn County with a conceptual look at routing regional-sized conveyance through south Big Horn County to Greybull. Potential rural users who have shown interest in regional supply are Greybull River users SW of Greybull and users west of Basin to the area centered at Otto. The town of Burlington may also benefit from regional supply. At the present time the study is focused upon the continued pursuit of exploration for a well in the southern part of the system.

This Level III request is for funding of the northern portion of the Big Horn Regional Water Supply Project. The Big Horn Regional Joint Powers Board (BHRJPB) retained HKM, Inc., consulting engineers, to design this northern system. As a first task in this process, HKM was asked to prepare a design report for the project. Early in the preliminary study of the project it became clear that the scope needed to be expanded to develop a hydraulic model of the BHRJPB's northern service area. This area includes the City of Worland, Washakie Rural Improvement and Service District, South Big Horn County Water Supply JPB, Town of Basin, and Town of Greybull. HKM and Engineering Associates (Washakie Rural's consultant) worked very closely with the SPONSOR and the funding agencies to develop a comprehensive hydraulic model and system configuration.

In an effort to reduce the overall costs to the BHRJPB and Washakie Rural I. & S. District, portions of Washakie Rural's system were upsized and reconfigured to carry regional water to its member agencies. This resulted in an estimated saving of about $2,000,000, with savings shared by both sponsors.

Delivery of the Town of Greybull's allocated emergency water supply was expected to be transmitted through the South Big Horn Water Supply JPB's existing system. However, based on the hydraulic modeling, it was determined that this system could only serve in a limited capacity, but, was inadequate to supply the full need. Several alternatives to improve the existing system were considered. However, the engineering team determined that a new pipeline from a point on the Regional's main transmission system east of the Town of Manderson to the Town of Greybull was the most cost effective solution.

Also included in this request is funding for a regional water storage tank, several pressure reducing stations, booster pump stations, and a SCADA system which will be integrated with the member agency systems.

Estimated Level III
Phase 1 CostsDesign: 
 Design Report$ 160,300.00
 Plans and Specifications$ 1,927,984.00
Estimated Level III  
Phase 2 Costs Construction: 
 Construction Elements:* 
     Element 1 $ 7,772,900.00
     Element 2 $ 617,000.00
     Element 3 $ 1,894,475.00
     Element 5B $ 1,338,287.00
     Element 6 $ 2,931,900.00
     Element 7B $ 1,238,399.00
     Element 9 $ 4,353,300.00
 Construction Element Subtotal $20,146,261.00
  
 Permitting $ 220,000.00
 Easements $ 282,000.00
 Legal $ 230,000.00
 Engineering $ 2,059,428.00
 Contingency $ 3,350,717.00
 Cost of Funding (RUS, SRF, SLIB)** $ 50,000.00
 Muti-Year Construction Inflation (5%/yr.)*** $ 0.00
 Project Manager ($35K/yr. as required) $ 160,000.00
 Total Project Costs $28,586,690.00
 Rounded $28,600,000.00
*The construction elements listed are to be constructed by the Big Horn Regional JPB. Elements 4A, 4B1, 4B2, 5A, 5C, 7A, and 8 will be constructed by the Washakie Rural Improvement and Service District.
**These funds are not WWDC project reimbursable.
*** Inflation was considered as part of the cost estimates.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
Level III funding request the WWDC recommends an additional $13,628,500.00 grant be added to this project. These additional funds will allow the grant portion of the project be raised from 50% to 67%.


 14. PROJECT:Big Horn Regional Water Supply
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:Big Horn Regional Joint Powers Board
LOCATION:Big Horn, Washakie, Hot Springs Counties
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 36 2000 I $160,000 2002
Level II 86 2001 I $670,000 2002
Level III 88 2001 I $5,500,000 2007
Level II 7 2002 I $675,000 2002

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
The 2000 WWDC Level II Study completed an investigation of groundwater potential for a municipal water supply in the southern Big Horn Basin. Eight (8) well sites were investigated within the southern Big Horn Basin that could potentially yield abundant (>500gpm), good quality (<500 mg/l TDS) water. These sites were chosen on the basis of geologic structure, drilling depths, geothermal gradient, distance from known geothermal activity, accessibility, and potential groundwater quality. An extensive review of groundwater data within the southern Big Horn Basin reveals that the most likely aquifer to yield abundant, good quality water is from the Paleozoic-age Madison-Big Horn aquifer system. A secondary target aquifer, that is deemed viable in the study, is the Cambrian-age Flathead Sandstone.

A test well was completed in late 2001 at the Wild Horse Anticline site as a Madison-Big Horn Aquifer completion. Production yield at this site did not meet the requirements of the project.

The original intent of ground water exploration in Hot Springs County was to establish a southern-basin well field capable of providing yield to match or exceed maximum daily use requirements of potential Hot Springs County users (including the town of Thermopolis) and provide a supplemental supply to joint powers users to the north when needed. One well may not feasibly meet this requirement. For example, other source well field configurations serving the joint powers service area utilizating wells, i.e., the Worland well field (2 wells), Manderson well field (2 "Wild Horse" wells), and the Greybull supply wells (2 Trapper Creek wells and Shell Canyon well). The Big Horn Regional Joint Powers Board passed a resolution on November 12, 2003, requesting to pursue two test wells in Hot Springs County.

A request for bids for drilling at two sites in Hot Springs County (Lysite Mountain Anticline site and Buffalo Creek Monocline site) was published in several newspapers and responses to the publications were opened on October 13, 2003. Two bid schedules were formulated, one for the Lysite Mountain location, which is the preferred site, and for the Buffalo Creek location. The low bid for the preferred site was approximately $300,000.00 in excess of the drilling subcontract budget. The low bid for the secondary site was within the existing drilling budget. Permitting and access is complete for both sites, with the exception of a BLM temporary use permit at the Lysite Mountain Anticline location. The budget increase of $925,000.00 would provide a sufficient drilling budget to allow for drilling at both the preferred site and the secondary site.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be continued in the New Development Program at Level II with an appropriation of $1,275,000.


 15. PROJECT:Big Piney Water Supply
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:Town of Big Piney, Incorporated Municipality
LOCATION:Sublette County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Levels II 10 1994 I $200,000 1996
Levels III 206 1995 I $410,000 1999
Levels III 59 1996 I $590,000 1999
Levels III 69 2003 II $475,000 2008

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The 1994 WWDC Level II Study for Big Piney/Marbleton recommended upgrades for Big Piney, including those that are being requested in this project. These upgrades are designed to increase system reliability, improve public health and safety, provide emergency and fire suppression water, and increase overall system operating efficiency. As a small town with limited resources and a stable population, Big Piney has worked since 1994 to develop priorities for improvements that will achieve the most value. The proposed improvements include a new 200,000 gallon elevated storage tank, updated well system controls, conversion to liquid chlorination (not WWDC eligible - treatment), a new supply well, and a transmission line connecting the Big Piney and Marbleton water supply systems.

The project has proceeded in two phases. The first phase is to install the pipeline connecting Big Piney and Marbleton. This portion of the project is awarded and work will begin in January 2004. The second phase is being designed and will go to construction in 2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is needed.


 16. PROJECT:Blackwillow Water Supply
LEVEL:II-Hold
SPONSOR:Blackwillow Subdivision
LOCATION:Hot Springs County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 8 1995 I $25,000   1996
Level II 15 1996 I Hold   1998
Level II 82 1998 I Hold   2000
Level II 36 2000 I Hold   2002
Level II 7 2002 I Hold* 2004
*A block appropriation of $15,000 was made for all hold projects.

PROJECT INFORMATION:
Blackwillow subdivision is located northeast of Thermopolis. There are 16 existing homes in the subdivision and surrounding area; all are on individual wells. The wells produce small quantities of poor quality water. Some residents have individual water treatment systems or haul water. In 1994, the sponsor requested assistance from the WWDC to complete a Level I study to determine their options for securing a good quality water supply.

The Level I study was completed by BRS Inc. in 1995. The Level I study delineated a possible service area, defined water supply alternatives, and recommended a preferred alternative. Preliminary designs and cost estimates were developed for the preferred alternative. The study determined that there are other homes in the area with similar problems. The subdivision has elected not to pursue further study at this time pending formation of a water district and the results of the test drilling program for the Southern portion of the regional water system.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The Commission recommends that the project be retained on Level II-Hold status.


 17. PROJECT:Bridger Valley Intake Structure Rehabilitation/Bridger Valley
 Reservoir
LEVEL:III/II
SPONSOR:Bridger Valley Joint Powers Board
LOCATION:Uinta County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation/New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level III 2 2001 II $138,000* 2005
Level III 88 2002 II $367,000* 2005
Level II 125 2003 I $125,000 2004
*50% grant

PROJECT INFORMATION:
A pre-design report was completed in March 2000 by Nelson Engineering and Richard P. Arber Associates for the replacement and expansion of the Bridger Valley Joint Powers Board (BVJPB) water treatment plant. The report includes an evaluation of intake upgrade alternatives taking into consideration pressure requirements at the WTP, access to intake site, sediment removal, permitting costs, regulatory issues and life cycle costs. Alternatives looked at included: alluvial wells, alternate diversion locations, raw water transmission line replacement and construction of a booster pump station. The most cost effective and implementable alternative incorporates the replacement of the existing 14-inch raw water pipeline along with the intake structure.

The BVJPB received Level III funding in 2001 to assist in the construction replacement of the existing intake and raw water diversion structure in the Smith's Fork River at the site of the existing structure. The intake is located 8,800 feet upstream from the regional water treatment plant. The previous structure was inadequate to provide the total raw water capacity of the new 4 MGD water treatment plant that is being funded by a Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF) loan. The intake structure also had problems associated with capacity at low river flows as well as problems with ice and trash accumulations.

The BVJPB completed design and construction of the intake structure and raw water transmission line during the summer of 2003. Storage tank design will be completed by Spring 2004 for scheduled construction by the end of 2004.

A Level II study was authorized by the 2003 Legislature to conduct a feasibility study for a water storage reservoir. The BVJPB owns and operates the water treatment facility that provides treated water for the Town of Lyman, Town of Mountain View, Blacks Fork Water and Sewer District and much of rural Uinta County in the Bridger Valley. The BVJPB has water rights from the Smiths Fork and Blacks Fork Rivers. They also have 1,500 acre feet (af) of water storage in the Stateline Dam. Their contract with the Bureau of Reclamation requires predetermined volumes of water be released from Stateline Dam each month. This means that about 700 af are released in the winter when water demands are low and when stream flow can typically meet the needs. There is also an instream flow requirement, which is met by the winter releases. The BVJPB wants to develop a water storage reservoir to store releases from the Stateline Dam in times of adequate stream flow to allow use of the stored water in summer and fall periods when flows are low and demand is high. The study is ongoing with a report anticipated to be available by the summer of 2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required.


 18. PROJECT:Bridger Valley Water Supply
LEVEL:II-Hold
SPONSOR:Bridger Valley Joint Powers Board and Pioneer Water and Sewer District
LOCATION:Uinta County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 43 1992 I $125,000   1994
Level II 10 1994 I $300,000   1996
Level II 15 1996 I Hold   1998
Level II 82 1998 I Hold   2000
Level II 36 2000 I Hold   2002
Level II 7 2002 I Hold* 2004
*A block appropriation of $15,000 was made for all hold projects.

PROJECT INFORMATION:
In 1990, the Bridger Valley Joint Powers Board requested assistance from the WWDC in determining the feasibility of expanding the board's service area. The Joint Powers Board presently supplies water to the towns of Mountain View and Lyman; the Blacks Fork, Lower Bench and Fort Bridger Water Districts; and 176 individual homes and businesses. Water users not in the service area have no potable water or have poor quality water in limited supplies. The Bridger Valley Joint Powers Board felt at that time they had sufficient water rights and water treatment plant capacity to serve additional users not included in the present service area.

In 1991, the WWDC completed the Level I study which evaluated the possibility of serving additional areas. The areas identified as the most likely to connect to the present system include: the area east of Mountain View and south of Lyman; the area surrounding Millburne, which is south of the Fort Bridger Water District and west of Mountain View; and the area surrounding the Uinta County Highway Shop, which is north of the treatment plant. These areas were organized into the Pioneer Water and Sewer District. The cost to connect the district to the present system was estimated to be $3,440,000. The number of potential taps in the district was estimated to be approximately 120. The costs to the potential users to purchase water from the board and repay the loans was estimated at $60-$65 per month per tap.

Due to the Joint Powers Board's inability to provide the necessary loan security, as the proposed project was outside its boundaries, the Pioneer Water and Sewer District took over as the project sponsor.

In 1992, the Level II study defined the proposed transmission pipeline alignment, mapped the proposed alignment, investigated the geologic conditions along that alignment, and evaluated the present water treatment plant. The Level II study found that the Bridger Valley Joint Powers Board system is operating at its maximum capacity and will need a major upgrade to provide clean water to its current members in the very near future. The Lyman Springs, which are a major component of the area water supply, also became a concern due to the possibility of EPA regulation.

In 1993, the sponsor requested an extension of the Level II study. This Level II study extension would investigate the possibility of developing a groundwater source. This groundwater source could serve the Pioneer District and be tied into the Bridger Valley Regional System as an additional water supply. This additional study was to include a groundwater exploration program and will provide conceptual plans and detailed cost estimates for a groundwater supply system to serve the district or to serve the regional system, depending on the results of the groundwater exploration program.

In 1994, the Level II study determined that there is a surface water connection problem with the Lyman Springs.

The Lyman Springs Rehabilitation project has been completed with construction of springs modifications, funded by WWDC and the installation of bag filters funded by the Town of Lyman. In 1995, due to the protests of the landowners in the area, the sponsors decided not to pursue the groundwater exploration program. The joint powers board is presently upgrading their diversion and treatment facilities with construction completion anticipated in the fall of 2003.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends that the project for expansion of water service be retained on Level II-Hold status.


 19. PROJECT:Buffalo Valley Water Supply
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Buffalo Valley Water District
LOCATION:Teton County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 46 1997 I $90,000   1999
Level III 38 1998 I $475,000* 2001
Level III 2 2001 I $475,000* 2005
*60% grant; 40% loan (7.25%, 30 years); plus $6,264 loan for well (7.25%, 30 years)

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The WWDC staff prepared a Level I study in 1996 that inventoried the existing system, evaluated water supply needs, and evaluated water supply alternatives for the water users in the Buffalo Valley area. Preliminary plans and cost estimates were developed for the identified alternatives and a preferred alternative was selected. In 1997 a Level II study was performed to drill a test well and test the well performance and prepare conceptual designs and cost estimates. The well was successfully completed in 1997 at a cost of $15,561.

The Buffalo Valley Water District received a 1998 grant and loan appropriation in the amount of $475,000 from Water Development Account I. The grant is for 60% of the WWDC eligible project costs with a 40% loan at a 7.25% interest rate over 30 years. The project scope included construction of a new 80,000-gallon storage tank system, well pump installation, control building, chlorination facilities, valving, telemetry system, and a transmission line to the storage tanks.

A contract with Jorgensen Engineering was negotiated by the district for project design and construction administration services. The WWDC funding legislation provided for a reversion date of July 1, 2001. There was a substantial project time delay owing to the issuance of a U.S. Department of Agriculture - Forest Service Special Use Permit for the storage tank system site which required amending the project legislation in 2001 to extend the reversion date to July 2005.

Construction of the project was started in August 2002, with final completion and Forest Service acceptance of site restoration work in December 2003. Final project closeout will take place by January 2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required.


 20. PROJECT:Buffalo Water Storage Tank
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Town of Buffalo, Incorporated Municipality
LOCATION:Johnson
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 7 2002 I $50,000 2004
Level III 69 2003 I $2,152,500 2008

PROJECT INFORMATION:
In October 2002 a level II study was completed for the Town of Buffalo to determine the costs and feasibility of placing an additional storage tank within the Town's water system. The town will have a 2.5 million gallon tank and transmission mains constructed.

The sponsor has contracted with an engineer to design the improvements. Surveying, legal description preparation and negotiations for the necessary rights of way are in process. Due to the nature of the project, two construction contracts will be bid and these will be built concurrently.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required.


 21. PROJECT:Byron Raw Water
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:Town of Byron, Incorporated Municipality
LOCATION:Big Horn
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 7 2002 II $40,000   2004
Level III 69 2003 II $912,000* 2008
*50% grant, 30% loan (6%, 30 years)

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Town of Byron has an open lined ditch system to convey water for residential irrigation. The system has been in place for many years and very expensive to maintain. It is also prone to backwater spills caused by debris in culverts, is a side-of-the-road hazard for vehicles, and an attractive nuisance for children. Subsequent to the level II study completed in 2002 the sponsor received a construction appropriation for Phase 1 of the project. The sponsor has requested funding for Phase 2, which is the balance of funding necessary to complete the project. Construction financing is 50% WWDC grant, 30% WWDC loan and 20% in-kind construction services provided by the sponsor.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be continued at Level III in the Rehabilitation Program with an additional appropriation of $752,000 for Phase 2 of the project. The financing plan includes an additional 50% grant of $470,000 and an additional 30% loan of $282,000 at 6% interest for 30 years. The total project appropriation is increased from $912,000 to $1,664,000.


 22. PROJECT:Canyon/Newcastle Area Water Supply
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:Canyon Improvement & Service District
LOCATION:Weston County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 125 2003 II $75,000 2004

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
The sponsor is a newly formed rural district located less than 5 miles east and north of Newcastle. Stetson Engineering, Inc completed a regional feasibility, cost analysis, and well siting study for Canyon I & S District in a 2003 Level II study. The study considered connecting Canyon users to existing supply and transmission infrastructure in and adjacent to Newcastle versus a stand-alone supply/storage/transmission/distribution system that could possibly tie into and enhance the regional system.

The City of Newcastle is the dominant purveyor of water to a regional system that also includes Salt Creek Water & Sewer District, West End Water District, Blacktail Water Users, and Cambria Water District. Presently, all of the above entities have their own source supply wells with the exception of Cambria WD. According to the 2000 WWDC Level II Newcastle Area Water Supply Master Plan, all existing source wells in operation could meet and exceed average day, maximum day, and peak hour demands for the duration of that study's planning period (to year 2023). The report concedes however, that the oversupply statement is misleading because of existing pipeline lengths and sizing, lack of storage at Salt Creek, West End, and Blacktail, and dependence on the Newcastle No. 1 Well (drilled in 1949), which if removed from service would result in even present demand not being met.

Presently, several factors preclude supplying Canyon users from already existing wells and supply lines in the Newcastle area. Present infrastructure cannot practically provide reliable supply to Canyon users. A topographic barrier prevents efficient transmission to Canyon users from the City of Newcastle's 373,000 gallon storage tank at Cambria. Salt Creek W&S District, which neighbors Canyon WD to the south, is unable to meet additional demands on its well. Moreover, water is moved between entities at Newcastle via contract sales. Currently, a regional entity (e.g., a joint powers organization) does not exist to manage common system components or rate structures. An interconnection with the region's dominant purveyor is not feasible because the City of Newcastle is concerned that growth in the Canyon area could potentially exhaust water supplies and force the City to develop new supply or limit growth.

The preferred alternative is to provide water supply to Canyon users by construction of a new well facility and supply system. If a high capacity well is discovered at a Canyon District location, it may prove to be an asset to the regional system since it could easily tie into the Salt Creek system. Total project cost is estimated at $1.9 million with a total monthly cost to users ranging between $151/tap per month and $174/tap per month depending on the availability of a second source of grant funding (SLIB or RUS).

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be continued in the New Development Program at Level II with an appropriation of $600,000.


 23. PROJECT:Casper Alcova Ditch Rehabilitation
LEVEL:New Application
SPONSOR:Casper-Alcova Irrigation District
LOCATION:Natrona County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Lateral 128-17 project segment includes replacement of earthen ditch with about 3,600 feet of pipe plus structures, valves, and measuring devices necessary to deliver irrigation water. The improvement should reduce seepage loss and improve operational efficiency. The Lateral 239 project segment will be replacement of several concrete drop structures with a pipe drop about 1,500 feet long including a concrete inlet structure and a concrete outlet stilling basin structure. The largest project component is converting Laterals 256-680 and 256-681 from open ditch to pipe. The new pipe delivery is anticipated to facilitate conversion of irrigated acres from flood to sprinkler and reduce seepage loss from the delivery laterals. The combined effect should reduce selenium concentrations in local drainage water. This project component is desired to be funded jointly with EPA 319 grant money administered by the Wyoming DEQ and funding from the WWDC. The WWDC funds will be used for purchase of materials only, while the 319 funds are planned to assist the sponsor with labor, equipment costs, and engineering for this component. NRCS is providing design and construction engineering services for Laterals 256-680 and 256-681.

The sponsor is responsible for all labor, equipment, engineering, permitting, legal, and land rights costs. WWDC is financing the purchase of materials with grant funds.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be incorporated in the Rehabilitation Program at Level III with an appropriation of $595,000. The financing plan is 100% grant for invoiced materials.


 24. PROJECT:Casper Alcova Tunnel Rehabilitation
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Casper-Alcova Irrigation District
LOCATION:Natrona County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level III 69 2003 II $170,000* 2008
*50% grant, 50% loan (6%, 30 years)

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The proposed project includes rehabilitation of Tunnel 3 and Tunnel 4 on the Casper Canal. These tunnels are concrete lined with concrete transitions to the earthen canal. Cracking and deterioration of the concrete lining and transitions resulting in heaves and voids are the primary items to correct. These tunnels are relatively high in the water delivery system and are therefore extremely important to the irrigators to keep in service. The proposed project would help assure water delivery to the irrigators and keep the irrigation district in good standing with the US Bureau of Reclamation, which owns the facilities. The project has been estimated to cost approximately $170,000.

Funding was appropriated by the legislature in 2003. The sponsor is seeking approval from district court to incur the debt. Design and construction should be completed in 2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action required.


 25. PROJECT:Casper Zone II
LEVEL:Level III
SPONSOR:City of Casper
LOCATION:Natrona County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 86 2001 I $60,000 2002
Level III 88 2002 I $3,188,000 2007

PROJECT INFORMATION:
Due to the rapid growth in the East Zone II area of Casper, the city would like to expand its storage and transmission facilities that serve the area. There have been two studies in the past in this area. However, rapid growth has changed the demands since that time. Civil Engineering Professional Inc. were retained to conduct the Level II analysis of the project. The study identified numerous infrastructure improvements that should be made by the City. The City has selected a development plan that includes new pipelines and storage facilities in the Eastern part of the City.

Design and construction of the project proceeded during 2003.

Design and construction of Phase I of this project is nearing completion. Some difficulties with obtaining the easements for Phase II have delayed progress. However, Phase II construction consisting of additional transmission pipeline and a water storage tank should commence during 2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action required.


 26. PROJECT:CBM Aquifer Storage and Retrieval
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:City of Gillette, Incorporated Municipality
LOCATION:Campbell County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 7 2002 I $510,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
This project was envisioned to test the feasibility of re-injecting and retrieving coal bed methane (CBM) water into the Fort Union aquifer and subsequent municipal use at Gillette. A municipal-size test well would also be drilled in an area heavily developed by coal-bed methane and also previously identified as a future Gillette well field. Several CBM producers are currently injecting CBM water as a means of disposal of excess produced water. Determining whether storage of this water and later retrieval is cost effective is one purpose of the project.

An interim report was prepared in September 2003 that compiled data from storage and retrieval pilot tests conducted in the vicinity of Gillette relative to storing produced coal bed methane water. The data is from 11 constant-rate pumping tests from 10 different wells and 7 constant rate injection tests. Also included are water quality analyses of the baseline water quality.

In the area where an ASR test well was planned, the depletion of CBM water occurred more rapidly than anticipated. Moving into the basin (westward) was deemed infeasible because declining of water quality and impractical distances from City of Gillette infrastructure. The secondary objective of exploration test drilling for a new Fort Union Formation well field began in December 2003 south of Gillette.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action required.


 27. PROJECT:Cheyenne Belvoir Ranch
LEVEL:New Application
SPONSOR:City of Cheyenne/Board of Public Utilities
LOCATION:Laramie County
PROGRAM:New Development

PROJECT DESCRIPTION::
The City of Cheyenne purchased the Belvoir Ranch, located west of the city, in June of 2003. The ranch consists of approximately 17,000 acres of stream valley and uplands located generally south of I-25 and north of the Wyoming-Colorado state line in Township13 North and Ranges 68 and 69 West. Lonetree Creek flows west to east from the flank of the Laramie Range through the ranch.

The purchase of the Belvoir Ranch was pursued by the City of Cheyenne in part because of the known ground water resource residing at relatively shallow depths (High Plains Aquifer System), the possibility of deep ground water development, and proximity to existing municipal well field infrastructure utilized by the City. Several irrigation wells drilled on the ranch, in the stream valley of Lonetree Creek, experience flowing conditions and associated excellent water quality. The ranch acquisition falls within the City's strategic plan for securing an additional/supplemental source of supply for the City of Cheyenne's future water needs.

The City of Cheyenne and Cheyenne Board of Public Utilities (BOPU) want a study of the newly acquired Belvoir Ranch to fully characterize the present development of water resources on and near the ranch and determine the potential for future development of water resources, more specifically the groundwater supply component. The project will include test drilling to determine best potential municipal well siting.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be incorporated into the New Development Program at Level II with an appropriation of $350,000.


 28. PROJECT:Cheyenne Hydro Power
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:City of Cheyenne
LOCATION:Laramie County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 7 2002 I $60,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The City of Cheyenne wished to pursue a detailed cost analysis of placing hydropower generators in their municipal water system. Their system has several reservoir dams and pressure reduction points with flow and pressure potential to generate power. The City completed a study in 1980 on the feasibility of hydropower generation in the water treatment plant feed lines. This new study updated and expanded that original 1980 study. This two-year study also examined the transmission requirements to get the generated power to a power user.

In 2003, the Board of Public Utilities liked the possibilities of power production at their water treatment plant intake listed in the report. However, with the City's large expenditures in 2003, the City did not feel they were ready to pursue the project this year.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends that the project be retained at a Level II-Hold status.


 29. PROJECT:Cheyenne Raw Water Supply #2
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:City of Cheyenne
LOCATION:Laramie County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 8 1995 II $250,000   1996
Level III 45 1997 II $1,800,000* 2000
Level III 69 2003 I $5,000,000* 2008
*50% grant, 50% loan @ 6%, 30 years

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The 1997 Legislature authorized WWDC funding in the amount of $1,800,000 (50% grant, 50% loan) to construct the first phase of a raw (untreated) water system to economically provide irrigation for parks, golf courses, cemeteries and recreational fields in the city. Under the first phase, an existing 16-inch water main was converted from transmitting treated water to conveying raw water for irrigation use at Lion's Park and at three 18-hole golf courses located in the northwest part of the city. This phase of the project resulted in a 3 million gallons per day (mgd) reduction in peak day demands for treated water.

The 2003 Legislature authorized funding in the amount of $5,000,000 (50% grant, 50% loan) for Phase II of the project, which will extend the raw water system from the Sloans Lake/Lions Park area further east, across the municipal airport to the Prairie View Golf Course area. This would enable the system to serve the four cemeteries south of the airport, the Morrie Avenue/Airport parkways, the Veterans Administration grounds, East High School grounds and athletic fields, two softball field complexes, the golf course, two baseball field complexes and two soccer field complexes. The irrigated lands served would be approximately 200 acres resulting in another 1.5 to 2.0 mgd savings in peak day treated water demands. A 1996 States West Water Resources Level II Water Supply Study indicates that each 1 mgd in reduced water treatment capacity saves approximately $1.3 million in capital costs plus a significant reduction in yearly operation and maintenance costs.

Design work on the project has been temporarily suspended, while the City of Cheyenne determines whether to proceed with raw water irrigation system expansion eastward from the Sloans Lake area or to provide the raw water irrigation source from the treated effluent of the Dry Creek waste water treatment plant. This determination is to be made by early 2004 with the design and construction to proceed as based on the decision.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required.


 30. PROJECT:Cheyenne South Crow Diversion
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:City of Cheyenne
LOCATION:Laramie County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 81 1999 II $80,000 2000
Level III 2 2001 II $70,000 2005
Level III 88 2002 II $680,000 2007

PROJECT INFORMATION:
This project consists of the rehabilitation of the South Crow Diversion Dam located approximately 20 miles west of Cheyenne. The city of Cheyenne constructed the dam in 1911 to impound and divert South Crow Creek water for municipal use. Depending upon the time of the year, it is estimated that up to 3 mgd can be utilized by the City of Cheyenne.

During the past several years, the city has not relied upon water which could be delivered by the South Crow System. The dam has developed several structural problems, with numerous leaks through the dam and severe concrete sloughing at various locations. As Cheyenne grows, and the use of both potable and raw water also grow, the need for additional water also increases. The city also desires to install a telemetry system and metering upgrades on the South Crow Dam and Reservoir. In 1999 the legislature approved $80,000 to evaluate the current condition of the South Crow Diversion Dam and to evaluate the rehabilitation options to bring the dam up to acceptable standards.

In 2000 the Commission recommended phasing construction of the project. The first phase is the final design with a cost of $70,000. The second phase is the actual construction of the project, which was estimated at approximately $1,096,000. The phased approach was recommended because of the lack of money in the Water Development accounts.

During the design phase of this project, several site difficulties were encountered. They include: land ownership, wet lands, and endangered species. This has resulted in an increased total estimated construction cost of $1,430,000. The total project cost including design, permitting and mitigation, access and right-of-way, and construction will be $1,500,000. The legislature provided the necessary funding in 2002.

The project design and construction are nearly complete.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action required.


 31. PROJECT:Cheyenne Supply Pipeline
LEVEL:Level III
SPONSOR:City of Cheyenne
LOCATION:Laramie County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 74 1993 I $250,000   1994
Level II 8 1995 II $250,000   1996
Level III 96 2000 I $11,000,000* 2004
Level III 69 2003 I $2,000,000* 2007
*60% grant; 40% loan (7.25%, 30 years)

PROJECT INFORMATION:
In 1992, the CBPU requested funding for several projects. The WWDC suggested the CBPU complete a master plan to prioritize future improvements. The city's existing master plan had become dated and did not address the latest EPA requirements.

In 1993, the Wyoming legislature approved funding to update the Cheyenne Water Supply Master Plan. In 1994 the master plan was completed. The plan identified needed improvements, suggested priorities, estimated costs, and now serves as a planning tool for the city. Approximately $62,000,000 in needed capital improvements has been identified. The identified improvements include an extensive upgrade to the CBPU Sherard Water Treatment Plant and several transmission system improvements. These improvements were prioritized and recommended for completion by the year 2007. Additional Level II analysis was recommended to refine designs and cost estimates.

In 1996, a Level II study of the Cheyenne Water Supply System was completed. Conceptual designs and cost estimates were prepared for 1) a raw water system to irrigate parks and golf courses, 2) improvements to the raw water lines feeding the water treatment plant, 3) a new water transmission main to the east side of Cheyenne, 4) corrosion analysis, and 5) improvements to the Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition System.

WWDC funding was authorized during the 2000 Legislature in the amount of $11,000,000 (60% grant, 40% loan) to construct a portion of a second raw water supply line from Crystal Reservoir to the new Sherard water treatment plant. The new 36-inch line total length is approximately 15 miles. The City of Cheyenne proposed to build approximately 12.1 miles of the lower part of the 36-inch line as the first phase of the project, based upon a project cost estimate of $11,000,000 and the knowledge that existing lines and the line extension to that point would be able to provide 36 MGD flows to the new Sherard water treatment plant. The remaining upper 3 miles of the 36inch line would then be built as a future Phase II as flow demands in Cheyenne increase beyond 36 MGD. With Phase II of the 36-inch line completed, total flow capacity of existing and new lines is estimated to be 58MGD.

Excellent competitive bids on the first phase of the project allowed the City of Cheyenne to extend the first phase of the project and additional 1.6 miles beyond the original 12.1 miles, increasing the raw water delivery capacity to the Sherard water treatment plant to 48 MGD. The remaining 1.3 miles from the Hecla diversion to Crystal Dam and Reservoir is currently under design and will be completed using the remaining $1.9 million balance available the $11,000,000 authorization.

The City of Cheyenne has been advised by their engineer not to utilize the full increased capacity of the pipeline (48 MGD) until the outlet works at Crystal Dam and Reservoir are modified to safely handle the increased flow. The City of Cheyenne therefore requested that the 2000 legislation authorizing this project be changed to allow modification of the outlet works pipes, valves and flow control building at Crystal Dam and Reservoir, along with increasing the project appropriation by $2 million. The 2003 Legislature authorized the project scope change and increased the project funding by the $2 million. Design on dam outlet modifications and pipeline to the Hecla Diversion will be completed by March 2004, with construction scheduled to commence during the summer of 2004. Construction is anticipated to be completed by the end of 2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required.


 32. PROJECT:Chugwater Water Supply
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Town of Chugwater
LOCATION:Platte County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 15 1996 I $75,000     1998
Level II 46 1997 I $100,000     1998
Level III 45 1997 II $103,500*   2000
Level III 16 1999 I $967,800** 2003***  
Level III 69 2003 I $240,000** 2005
*50% grant
**60% grant
***This reversion date was extended to 2005.

PROJECT INFORMATION:
Under the 1997 Level III construction appropriation the pipeline from the in-town wells to the storage tank was replaced with larger pipe. Under the 1999 Level III construction appropriation one in-town well was replaced, another in-town well rehabilitated, a new water storage tank west of town built, and a connecting pipeline between the new tank and the distribution system installed. The town has purchased property west of town subsequent to finding a promising groundwater supply there. One new production well west of town will be completed in 2004.

It is anticipated a pipeline from the new well to the new storage tank plus a pump and controls will be constructed in 2004, or possibly completed in 2005.

In 2003 the legislature increased project funding by $240,000 and extended the reversion date to July 1, 2005. This project will provide the town with a new water source away from the potential hazards of the in-town wellfield area. WWDC funding is 60% grant with the remaining 40% provided by the sponsor through RUS.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action required.


 33. PROJECT:Coates Road Water Supply
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Coates Road Improvement & Service District
LOCATION:Natrona County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 7 2002 I $100,000 2004
Level III 69 2003 I $275,000 2008

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The recently completed South Garden Creek Level I Study looked at the potential of adding the area south of Casper (and alongside Casper Mountain) to the City of Casper's public water supply system. Five unique service areas were identified in the Level I Study, including: Squaw Creek/Wolf Creek, South Garden Creek, Elkhorn Valley, Coates Road and Pursel Lands. The preferred water supply source for the Coates Road service area was identified as the City of Casper water system as an outside City wholesale water customer. The area would construct a water system with smaller water lines that provide for only domestic uses. Additionally, the area would own, operate and maintain their system, and perform the meter reading, billing and the repair processes.

An appropriation of $275,000 for 50% of the eligible cost of the improvements was approved by the 2003 Legislature. The district has thus far been unsuccessful in obtaining the remaining 50% to begin the project.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No Legislative action required.


 34. PROJECT:Cokeville Reservoir
LEVEL:I
SPONSOR:Cokeville Development Company
LOCATION:Lincoln County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 125 2003 I $200,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Cokeville Development Company was created by a group of irrigators in the Smiths Fork Drainage. They requested a study to identify storage opportunities in the Smiths Fork drainage. The Cokeville Development Company's request identified the need for a multipurpose reservoir that would provide water for agricultural uses, for flood and erosion control.

Several studies have been completed for this area. Please refer to Smiths Fork Dam in the completed projects section for additional information. The most recent of these studies was completed in the mid 80's. More information is needed regarding wetland and endangered species permitting issues. Additionally, an alternative analysis needs to be completed that will attempt to identify any potential off channel reservoir sites. A recent site visit revealed significant wetlands would be inundated at most of the listed sites. Therefore, WWDC is conducting Level I study to identify potential environmental constraints and off channel storage potential, and to update the costs associated with this project. This project is currently under way and the report should be completed in November 2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required at this time.


 35. PROJECT:Crestview Water Supply
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Crestview Estates Improvement & Service District
LOCATION:Campbell County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 82 1999 I $200,000 2000
Level III 96 2000 II $41,000 2004

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
This project entails completion of the connection of the Crestview Estates system to the Antelope Valley system and rehabilitation of the existing Crestview well. Crestview completed an agreement for the exchange of water with Antelope Valley in 2002.

In 2003, the district completed its connection with the Antelope Valley System. This is a prerequisite to rehabilitation of the districts well. It also provides an emergency water supply. The district's well will be taken off line, rehabilitated and put back in service in 2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required.


 36. PROJECT:Crook County Reservoirs and Water Management
LEVEL:New Application
SPONSOR:Crook County Irrigation District
LOCATION:Crook County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 82 1998 I $100,000 2000

PROJECT INFORMATION:
A study was completed in 1999 that investigated the possibility of providing additional water to the sponsor for irrigation purposes with the transfer of ownership of Driskill Reservoir. Due to a limited number of beneficiaries the transfer of ownership was never undertaken. This year Crook County Irrigation District requested an expansion of the study to include the entire Belle Fourche Drainage below Keyhole Reservoir.

The purpose of this study would be to investigate the Belle Fourche Drainage and its tributaries within the State of Wyoming to identify areas of shortage. Shortages would then be quantified and reservoir storage opportunities would be identified to satisfy the shortages. This study would be similar to the Green River Groundwater Recharge and Alternative Storage Study that was designed to take the information generated by the River Basin Plan and use it to develop a list of storage sites that satisfy the needs of the basin. Wyoming is allocated 10% of the flow in the Belle Fourche River by the Belle Fourche River Compact. Not all of Wyoming's water is used in the state of Wyoming. This study would consider the amount of water allocated to Wyoming by the compact and identify ways to put Wyoming's undeveloped share to use in Wyoming.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
It is recommended that this project be incorporated into the New Development program at Level I with an authorization of $150,000.00.


 37. PROJECT:Crow Creek Groundwater Recharge
LEVEL:II-Hold
SPONSOR:Laramie County Conservation District
LOCATION:Laramie County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 79 1988 I $150,000   1990
Level II 123 1990 I $1,000   1992
Level II 43 1992 I $1,000   1994
Level II 82 1998 I Hold   2000
Level II 36 2000 I Hold   2002
Level II 7 2002 I Hold* 2004
*A block appropriation of $15,000 was made for all hold projects.

PROJECT INFORMATION:
In 1986 Laramie County submitted an application to the WWDC requesting a flood control and groundwater recharge study of the Crow Creek drainage. Laramie County indicated that development in Cheyenne has aggravated flooding problems on Crow Creek. The flood control portion of the study was completed in 1989. As a result, flood control plans were developed for Crow Creek below Cheyenne, Dry Creek, and Allison Draw.

The groundwater recharge portion of the study was completed in 1990, and concluded that without Cheyenne wastewater effluent there was a limited amount of water available for recharge. Stream gaging equipment was installed in the Carpenter area to better quantify the volume of water available.

In 1997 the Laramie County Conservation District applied to the WWDC for assistance in developing inexpensive spreader dikes, and other facilities, to economically induce recharge from Crow Creek into the alluvial aquifer near Carpenter. Their application was rejected because the conservation district was unable to provide sufficient security. However, the project was placed on hold to allow WWDC staff to provide technical support.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends that the project be retained at Level II-Hold status.


 38. PROJECT:Crowheart Area/Dinwoody Canal System
LEVEL:New Application
SPONSOR:Shoshone & Arapaho Tribes
LOCATION:Fremont County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation

PROJECT INFORMATION:
A Level I water supply study was requested to help identify solutions to chronic water shortages at the end of the Dinwoody Canal System (Crowheart and Willow Creek areas). Specifically, the study would investigate the feasibility and cost/benefits of a storage facility on Willow Creek, enlargement and or improvement of the Dinwoody Canal System, and enlargement of Lower Dinwoody Lake.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The Commission recommends that the project be incorporated into the Rehabilitation Program at Level I with an appropriation of $150,000.


 39. PROJECT:Dayton Groundwater
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:Town of Dayton
LOCATION:Sheridan County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 36 2000 I $60,000 2002
Level II 86 2001 II $50,000 2002
Level II 7 2002 I $460,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
In December 2002, the WWDC completed the drilling of a Madison deep well for the Town of Dayton. Artesian flow was approximately 85 gallons per minute (gpm) with pumping capacities near 250 gpm. These amounts were not great enough to meet the peak day demands for the Town or great enough to potentially serve as a regional supply well for the towns of Dayton and Ranchester in the future. In August 2003 the WWDC approved an acid enhancement phase for the well, which was completed in September 2003. The acid enhancement resulted in an increase of the flowing yield to approximately 250 gpm with a pumping capacity of approximately 650 gpm. The Town is ready to purchase the well from the WWDC.

Purchase price of Dayton Madison well #1 - $177,500

The mitigation requirements of the permanent well easement, pipeline easement and access easement are that twelve spruce trees be planted at the well site to screen the well and protect the viewshed of the landowner. This cost includes the purchase of the trees, planting, and a one year guarantee. Dayton is asking for a 50% grant to assist with this purchase.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be incorporated into the New Development Program at Level III with an appropriation of $3,000. The WWDC further recommends that the well be transferred to the sponsor for $177,500, which is 50% of the construction cost.


 40. PROJECT:Dayton Water Supply Rehabilitation
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Town of Dayton
LOCATION:Sheridan County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level III 2 2001 II $440,000 2005
Level III 88 2002 II $179,200 2005

PROJECT INFORMATION:
During the 2001 legislative session approval was given to fund the replacement of an existing transite water line, to fund the installation of pipeline to an existing booster station, and to fund the addition of a new booster station for the Town of Dayton. This project was called the Dayton Water Supply Rehabilitation Project. After funding was received the town of Dayton hired Entech, Inc. to design and supervise construction of the new pipeline and booster station. Currently, the towns of Dayton and Ranchester are discussing the potential for a regional system.

To facilitate this regional concept the transmission main line that was approved for construction funding during the 2001 legislative session was increased in size from 12" to 16" to increase the capacity needed for the two towns combined. The total project cost was authorized at $880,000 by the 2001 legislative session. To accommodate the regional supply concept the total project cost was increased to $1,032,000 and the grant/loan mix was adjusted from a 50/50 split to 60/40 split. Construction the pipeline portion of the project is scheduled for completion in early 2004. Until more information is known about the regional system it would be difficult to size the pump station. For this reason the final design and construction for the booster station will wait until more information is known about the regional system.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action required at this time.


 41. PROJECT:Deaver Flume Rehabilitation Project
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Deaver Irrigation District
LOCATION:Park/Big Horn
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 86 2001 II $100,000 2002
Level III 69 2003 II $46,500* 2008

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Deaver Irrigation District would like to rehabilitate an aging irrigation delivery system. Portions of Deaver's delivery system utilize metal and wood flumes, many of which are becoming aged and un-repairable. The District would like to replace the Marchant Coulee flume with a stainless steel bent sheet metal flume and replace the Deaver flume, which is an 80 year old wooden legged flume, with a buried siphon. These recommendations were made during a WWDC level II study completed in October 2002.

The sponsor should complete construction of the Deaver siphon during the winter of 2003-2004. The Marchant Coulee flume is being investigated further to determine the best course of action.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action required.


 42. PROJECT:Deer Creek Dam and Reservoir
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:State of Wyoming
LOCATION:South of Glenrock, Converse County, Wyoming
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level III 52 1984 I $3,000,000 N/A
Level IV 89 1985 I $45,000,000 N/A
Level IV 59 1996 I $15,000,000 N/A
Level IV 81 1999 I $13,500,000 N/A

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Pathfinder Modification Project has been proposed as a less expensive replacement for the Deer Creek Project. The Pathfinder Modification Project will also address Platte River endangered species issues. The estimated construction cost for the Deer Creek Project is between $66,000,000 and $100,000,000. The estimated cost for the Pathfinder Modification Project is less than $5,000,000.

The Pathfinder Modification Project involves increasing the height of Pathfinder Dam by 2.39 feet to recapture 54,000 acre feet of storage space lost to sediment. Twenty thousand (20,000) acre feet of the recaptured space would be allocated to achieve the same municipal water supply benefits as the Deer Creek Dam. The remaining 34,000 acre feet of storage space would serve the federal water contractors in Wyoming and Nebraska and other Wyoming water users by resolving the outstanding Section 7 Endangered Species Act consultation on the federal reservoirs and pending Section 7 consultations of special use permits on forest lands.

The 34,000 acre feet storage space would be allocated as a water supply component to resolve endangered species issues in the North Platte Basin through the Platte River Recovery Implementation Program. While the parameters of the program are still being negotiated, Wyoming's goal in participating in the program is to continue diverting and beneficially using North Platte water by achieving regulatory certainty on issues relating to the recovery of the whooping crane, piping plover, least tern, and pallid sturgeon.

In order to alleviate the impacts of recapturing the 54,000 acre feet and to compensate for the municipal storage account, project funds would also be used to finance both Kendrick and North Platte project irrigator's share of upcoming safety of dams modifications on the federal dams in Wyoming and to resolve the selenium problems at Goose and Rasmus Lee Lakes within the Kendrick Project. While the recaptured space would enjoy the benefits of the 1904 storage right, provisions would be provided to insure that the recaptured space could not place a call on existing non-federal direct flow and storage rights above Pathfinder Reservoir.

In order for the Pathfinder Enlargement to be implemented, the following institutional issues must be resolved:

  1. The Department of Interior must approve the concept and agree to provide the regulatory certainty desired by the state and the water users.
  2. The Governor must approve the project.
  3. The legislature must authorize the use of the Deer Creek funds to participate in the safety of dam modifications, the selenium issues on the Kendrick Project, and enlargement of Pathfinder Dam.
  4. Formal agreements must be negotiated with the Bureau of Reclamation, the affected federal water contractors, and the municipal water users.
  5. The Board of Control must approve a change of use for the recaptured storage space in Pathfinder Reservoir. The State Engineer and legislature must approve the interstate transfer of water residing in the 34,000 acre foot environmental account to transport to Nebraska for endangered species purposes.
  6. Congressional authorization may be required to amend the original purpose of the Pathfinder Dam to include municipal and environmental uses.
  7. NEPA and Section 404 of the Clean Water Act clearances must be achieved.

It is obvious that in order to achieve the above, there must be broad based public support for the project.

With the recovery of storage space under the 1904 Pathfinder water right, the Kendrick Project water rights, which are junior to the Pathfinder water rights, would not come into priority as often. Therefore Kendrick Project irrigators would be adversely impacted. The WWDC hired a consultant to investigate the magnitude of the impact and to evaluate the operations of the Casper-Alcova Irrigation District (The Kendrick Project) for opportunities to conserve or otherwise mitigate these adverse impacts. The Phase I Study evaluated the impacts and recommended potential mitigation measures. Phase II of the study included conceptual design of selected components for construction. Phase III was an evaluation of available technology that might facilitate the implementation of conservation measures. The Legislature provided funds during the 2002 session to design and to acquire all necessary construction permits and environmental clearances.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required at this time.


 43. PROJECT:Douglas Water Supply Project (formerly Douglas Master Plan)
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:City of Douglas
LOCATION:Converse County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level III 16 1999 I $1,995,000 2002
Level III 69 2003 I $ 75,000 2005

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The purpose of the project is to implement the remedial measures that have previously been in the water system master plan that was compiled for the city of Douglas and adjacent areas. There are currently 2,275 taps within the corporate limits of the city of Douglas and approximately 75 outside the city limits. A population of 5,800 is currently being served. The areas outside the city include users along the Little Box Elder Spring transmission line, users along the Sheep Mountain Well transmission line, and users within the Ridgewater Estates Improvement and Service District.

The city currently has three sources of potable water: 1) the Little Box Elder Spring, 2) the water treatment plant located along the North Platte River, and 3) the Sheep Mountain well. The master plan study evaluated the existing transmission and distribution system and examined the ability of the sources in the system to meet the current demands and future demands in the anticipated areas of growth in Douglas. Hydraulic modeling was used to isolate the cause for low water pressure problems in two areas of the city, the Riverbend subdivision and Frontier Village. Potential system modifications were considered to address inadequate system pressures. Preliminary designs were prepared for potential solutions and cost estimates were made for remedying transmission and distribution problems.

The city of Douglas has experienced steady growth since the late 1980's. Additional potable water sources have been added to meet the increasing demands in the system. However, the entire transmission, distribution and storage system had not been evaluated or updated. The water treatment plant and the Sheep Mountain well have been added to the system over the years. As they were added to the system, the impacts of each source on the entire system was never thoroughly evaluated.

A contract for rehabilitation of the town's tanks was awarded in early 2001 and was completed in 2002. A third project to reconstruct the Wyoming Law Enforcement Academy booster station was also completed in the summer of 2002.

Evaluation of options to resolve the issues identified in the Master Plan Document (Level I Study) was conducted by Civil Engineering Professionals Incorporated of Casper, Wyoming. To address the Safe Drinking Water Act ground water under the influence of surface water issues, a well drilling program was initiated to intercept the flow at the Box Elder Spring before it rises to the surface. This drilling program was unsuccessful. Therefore, in order to protect the Box Elder Spring improvements are being undertaken. The project will be completed during the 2004 construction season.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No Legislative action required.


 44. PROJECT:Dubois Regional Water Supply
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:Town of Dubois, Incorporated Municipality
LOCATION:Fremont County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 82 1998 I $75,000 2000
Level II 7 2002 I $75,000 2004
Level II 125 2003 I $20,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
In 1999 a WWDC Level I master water supply plan was completed for the Town of Dubois. The study recommended that the town pursue a Level II feasibility study (test drilling, preliminary design, cost estimation, funding planning) that concentrated on constructing a new well at the airport and siting a new water storage tank. Other improvements to be considered for construction funding were: 1) a new municipal supply well on the west side (near Well #8), 2) extending the municipal system to serve the Painted Hill Estates subdivision, which lies southeast of town, 3) replace defective distribution system valves, 4) replacing undersized mains, 5) looping dead end transmission lines, 6) installing additional fire hydrants in fire flow deficient portions of town, 7) replacing the tank level and pump control systems, 8) installing chlorinators at each supply well, and 9) implementing a more efficient system operating plan.

The 2003 WWDC Level II Study for Dubois recommended a test-drilling program to replace Well No. 8 and determine viable sites for future municipal wells. Also recommended was a test well at the town airport. The budget for extending the present Level II study includes funding for two (2) pilot test wells, one (1) production size test well to replace Well No. 8, one (1) production-size test well located at the town's airport, and consultant engineering fees to manage and complete this additional phase of the study.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be continued at Level II in the New Development program with an appropriation of $400,000 to finance drilling 3 pilot test wells and on production sized test well.


 45. PROJECT:Dubois SCADA
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:Town of Dubois, Incorporated Municipality
LOCATION:Fremont County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
I 82 1998 I $75,000 2000
II 7 2002 I $75,000 2004
II 125 2003 I $20,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The 2003 WWDC Level II Study for Dubois concluded that a Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) telemetry system should be installed to replace antiquated and problematic control systems (basically, hand switches). The new SCADA should have the following features: 1) an Ethernet base radio system, 2) non-proprietary PLC based Master Terminal Unit (MTU) and Remote Terminal Units (RTU's), 3) a central control station, and 4) an alarm dialer system. The SCADA system will also aid the Town in meeting their Home Land Security goals by providing a method to install and monitor intrusion/tamper alarms on the tanks, well buildings, and vaults.

Estimated Level III
Phase 1 Costs:
Design$ 7,944
Estimated Level III
Phase 2 Costs:
Centralized Control Station (MTU)$ 16,200
Remote Terminal Units$ 40,800
Repeater Station$ 5,800
Permitting$ 794
Engineering (10%)$ 6,280
Contingency (15%)$ 10,362
   Total Project Costs$ 88,180
     Rounded$ 90,000

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be incorporated into the New Development program at Level III with an appropriation of $45,000.


 46. PROJECT:Eight Mile Water Supply
LEVEL:New Application
SPONSOR:Eight Mile Improvement & Service District
LOCATION:Campbell County
PROGRAM:New Development

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
Eight Mile Subdivision and District is located eight miles west of Gillette, just north of I-90 and Force Road interchange. The district is supplied by a single deep well (1,466 total depth, completed in Fort Union Formation Aquifer) drilled in 1981. The well and storage tank are unable to meet for the present demand. A smaller neighboring subdivision, High Plains Subdivision, is under EPA Administrative Order to correct system deficiencies within their drinking water systems. The two entities have combined in the application to WWDC for a Level II study to determine preferred alternatives for combing the two systems that would solve problems they both now face. These entities currently lie outside the Gillette Planning District Boundary established in 1994.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be incorporated into the New Development Program at Level II with an appropriation of $60,000.


 47. PROJECT:Encampment/Sierra Madre Water Supply
LEVEL:New Application
SPONSOR:Town of Encampment and Sierra Madre Joint Powers Board
LOCATION:Carbon County
PROGRAM:New Development

PROJECT INFORMATION:
This project will evaluate existing wells and identify the historic water use for Encampment and the Sierra Madre JPB. Due to the ongoing drought coupled with tightening federal drinking water regulations, Encampment would like to join the Sierra Madre Joint Powers Board and utilize their groundwater source. In order for the Sierra Madre JPB to serve both the of Town Encampment and their customers an additional well may be needed.

Encampment currently has a raw water irrigation system that serves a majority of homes in town. This study would also look at the cost and feasibility of serving the Sierra Madre JPB with an expansion of this raw water irrigation system. Encampment would like to use their existing surface water right for the raw water system.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be incorporated in the New Development Program at Level II with an appropriation of $250,000 which includes funding to conduct a groundwater exploration program.


 48. PROJECT:Evanston/Bear River Regional
LEVEL:New Application
SPONSOR:Towns of Evanston and Bear River
LOCATION:Uinta County
PROGRAM:New Development

PROJECT INFORMATION:
In September 2000, the WWDC completed a Level I master plan for the North Uinta County Improvement and Service District. In 2001 the area in and around the District incorporated into the Town of Bear River and the District has dissolved and all of its functions have been assumed by Bear River.

In the Level I master plan, a regional pipeline between the two towns was identified as the preferred alternative to meet the long term needs of Bear River and the unincorporated area south to Evanston. The sponsors would like to perform a Level II feasibility and cost analysis of this alternative to determine supply sources, potential customers, operation of the system, and individual costs to residents.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be incorporated in the New Development Program at Level II with an appropriation of $70,000.


 49. PROJECT:Fayette Irrigation District
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Fayette Irrigation District
LOCATION:Sublette County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 81 1999 II $75,000   2000
Level III 96 2000 II $98,500   2004
Level III 88 2002 II $75,000* 2005
*Reduced appropriation from $98,500 to $75,000 at sponsor's request.

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Fayette Irrigation District would like to rehabilitate a major conveyance ditch known as the West Lateral. This portion of the system has the potential to irrigate 403 acres or roughly 19% of the total adjudicated acres in the district. A Level II study by WWDC was completed in 1999.

The district is eager to repair their aging system and is wary of involuntary abandonment of their water rights. This district holds a 1906 water right for approximately 21 cfs; and another right secured in 1952 for 7.45 cfs. By completing the rehabilitation of this irrigation system, WWDC can prevent the loss of this water to downstream, out of state users.

While most lots are broken into 10 acres, there are several district members who own several lots and are able to produce hay for sale. The largest agricultural production occurs on 300 acres of irrigable land known as the Christmann Ranch.

The 1999 Level II study conducted an inventory of the system, identified needed rehabilitation and improvements, examined the potential for an improved water supply, and prepared conceptual designs and cost estimates for those items.

The 2000 session of the legislature authorized a Level III project loan of $98,500 for a period of 20 years at 7.25% interest. The project has a reversion date of July 1, 2004. The sponsor declined to move forward with the project due to financial concerns.

The sponsor is currently rehabilitating a smaller portion of the conveyance system, which would result in a smaller debt load to the District. The sponsor's request was approved by the 2002 legislature. An engineer has been hired and design work is underway. Repairs should be completed in the spring of 2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required.


 50. PROJECT:Gillette Central Zone Isolation Project
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:City of Gillette
LOCATION:Campbell County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level III 2 2001 II $75,000 2005
Level III 88 2002 II $684,500 2006

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
Pursuant to the 1999 City of Gillette Water System Evaluation, this project calls for construction of four new transmission lines and the installation of isolation valves to increase static pressure in an area of town known as Twin Spruce. Modeling of this area was done to investigate areas of low pressure and low available fire flows. To create higher pressures, the area must be isolated and included in one of the other existing higher pressure zones in the City or a new pressure zone must be established.

An evaluation of this project was prepared for the city by Stetson Engineering, Inc. This report served as the basis for the design funding that was provided by the 2001 legislature. The design was completed in 2002, and a construction contract was awarded to Hot Iron, Inc. The amount of eligible work was $618,201.25. This project is complete with only paperwork remaining.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required on this project.


 51. PROJECT:Gillette Madison and Pine Ridge Tanks
LEVEL:New Application
SPONSOR:City of Gillette
LOCATION:Campbell County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
The City of Gillette's water system is supplied by a number of Madison wells which pump to the Madison and Pine Ridge pump stations located approximately 10 miles north of Moorcroft. At each station is a storage tank which serves to level out the pumping rates of the wells and provides a small quantity of in line storage. These storage tanks are in need of rehabilitation. Each tank will be taken out of service and recoated. In order to accomplish this, an alternate method of providing the in line storage will need to be in place.

Estimated Level III
Final Design Cost$ 203,275
Madison Tank$ 828,820
Pine Ridge Tank$ 648,140
Items common to both tanks$ 129,960
Construction Subtotal$ 1,810,195
Engineering (10%)$ 160,692
Construction Subtotal #2$ 1,970,887
Contingency (15%)$ 265,142
Cost of Funding (RUS,SRF, SLIB)$            0
Multi year construction inflation$            0
Total Project Cost$ 2,236,029
Rounded$ 2,236,000
WWDC Grant$ 1,118,000
Sponsor's responsibility$ 1,118,000

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be incorporated into the Rehabilitation Program at Level III with an appropriation of $1,118,000.


 52. PROJECT:Glenrock Sunup Ridge Tank Rehabilitation
LEVEL:New Application
SPONSOR:Town of Glenrock-Municipality
LOCATION:Converse County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation

PROJECT INFORMATION:
In 2002 the Town of Glenrock contracted for inspection of the Sunup Ridge storage tank. This inspection revealed the need for interior structural repairs, repair to the overflow, and recoating. This project will complete these necessary repairs and complete some miscellaneous electrical repairs.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be incorporated in the Rehabilitation Program at Level III with an appropriation of $132,750.


 53. PROJECT:Glenrock Well and Tank
LEVEL:New Application
SPONSOR:Town of Glenrock-Municipality
LOCATION:Converse County
PROGRAM:New Development

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The purpose of this Level II Study project is to drill a test well near existing Well #5 and determine the feasibility of constructing a water storage tank near this location. This study will also evaluate a power generation system at the current pressure reducing valve near Well #2, and include a hydraulic analysis of the present system.

The town of Glenrock is supplied by three wells. "Well #1" and "Well #2" are shallow wells (230' deep) drawing from the Deer Creek alluvium, "Well #5" is 1174 ft deep and located in a now alluvial aquifier. Wells #1 and #2 have a direct impact on surface water flows and can be shut down if State Regulation is requested by affected water users which leaves the entire towns' water supply reliant on Well #5. The Town would like the flexibility of shutting Well #1 and Well #2 off during the summer. Well #5 has shown enough promise that Glenrock would like to investigate drilling another well near Well #5, which would give the town flexibility and ensure adequate water supply when Wells #1 and #2 are off. In addition, the town would like to construct a new water storage tank near Well #5 with the hopes of connecting the new well and Well #5.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be incorporated in the New Development Program at Level II with an appropriation of $600,000. The appropriation includes funding for a ground water exploration program.


 54. PROJECT:Goshen Irrigation District Water System
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Goshen Irrigation District
LOCATION:Goshen County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 81 1999 II $75,000   2000
Level III 96 2000 II $1,726,000* 2004
*100% grant for invoiced materials. The sponsor is responsible for all other project costs.

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Goshen Irrigation District received a $1,726,000 grant for 100% of invoiced materials purchase to automate the water delivery system, to rehabilitate farm turnouts and to implement seepage control measures, such as canal lining and placing ditches into pipe. The construction will be performed with district resources at district cost. Engineering, permitting, and other project costs will be borne by the district.

When constructed, the improvements will reduce seepage losses in canals and laterals and enable GID to increase system efficiencies.

Essentially all of the laterals contemplated for construction have been constructed in the first three seasons, using about 55% of project funding. The sponsor is requesting a three year extension of the reversion date in order to finance materials for other sites to further conserve water and improve operating efficiency. Additional funds are not being sought.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the reversion date for project funding be amended to be July 1, 2010.


 55. PROJECT:Goshen Re-regulating Reservoir
LEVEL:II-Hold
SPONSOR:Goshen Irrigation District
LOCATION:Goshen County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 10 1994 I Hold   1996
Level II 15 1996 I Hold   1998
Level II 82 1998 I Hold   2000
Level II 36 2000 I Hold   2002
Level II 7 2002 I Hold* 2004
*A total appropriation of $15,000 is available for projects on hold

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Goshen Irrigation District delivers water to 52,484 acres, which is owned by approximately 355 farmers. The present assessment is $18.76/acre.

In 1992, the GID requested an evaluation of a small (1000 acre feet) re-regulating reservoir. The reservoir was planned to be located on Horse Creek, upstream of siphon #4. A small reservoir at this location would enable the district to better regulate delivery of water to lands at the end of the system. In addition, a dam at this site would store water when storms allow water deliveries to be reduced. At the present time, water in the canal is wasted when calls for irrigation water are no longer needed because of rain. Six thousand (6,000) acre feet of water could be saved annually if the reservoir was constructed.

A December 1993 Level II study evaluated several alternate dam sites. The original site at the Horse Creek Siphon was determined to be the most cost effective. Conceptual designs and cost estimates were prepared.

Negotiations between the district and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Wyoming Game and Fish Department and the Gering Fort Laramie Irrigation District must be successfully completed if the project is to proceed. The district has decided to postpone any further planning for this project until institutional constraints involving water rights and wetland mitigation issues are resolved.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
It is recommended that the project be retained at Level II-Hold status


 56. PROJECT:Green River Supply Canal
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:Green River Irrigation District
LOCATION:Sublette County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 7 2002 II $200,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Green River Canal has been in operation for many years and delivers water to irrigators with water rights that date back to the early 1900's. Water is delivered to 5,830 acres from Cotton Wood Creek and the Green River. Currently the canal is unable to carry its entire water right of 84 cfs. The canal suffers from delivery, conveyance, erosion, and seepage problems. The primary diversion is from the Poole Slough off of the Green River. The condition of Poole Slough diversion has deteriorated to the point that it is hazardous to operate. The Green River Canal water is transported through Cottonwood Creek. It is believed that there are significant losses suffered through this stretch of the canal. Due to the length of the canal this study was established on a two-year time line focusing on solutions to the problems facing the Green River Canal Irrigators.

New research in the area of canal seepage indicates that polyacrilimide (PAM) can be added to canal water to cause suspended sediments to flocculate out of canal water. This technology has been used in water treatment for years and has been shown to have good potential to reduce seepage in irrigation canals at a fraction of the cost of conventional liners. A pilot study has been proposed that would examine application rates, monitor seepage rates, and report on application procedures. This technology has the potential to benefit irrigation districts across the state. This pilot study would help identify the effectiveness of this new technology.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
It is recommended that this project be incorporated into the Rehabilitation Program at Level II with an authorization of $40,000.00.


 57. PROJECT:Greybull Crossing & Tank
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Town of Greybull
LOCATION:Big Horn County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 46 1997 I $55,000   1998
Level III 96 2000 I $1,850,000* 2004
*60% Grant & 40% Loan (7 1/4%, 20 years)

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Town of Greybull system consists of an infiltration gallery, three flowing wells, two tanks with 1.3 million gallons of storage, and a number of manual and automatic control valves. The town is under administrative order from EPA for violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule associated with the diversion through their infiltration gallery on Shell Creek. EPA has recommended that the town add storage on the west side of the river. Currently the town's only storage facility is located on the east side of the river, this situation leaves them vulnerable to a line failure at their river crossing. In addition, residents southwest of Greybull have requested water service.

The Level II study makes recommendations regarding additional storage, transmission and distribution lines that will resolve the town's storage problems, provide water to areas adjacent to town, and provide for more efficient operation of the system.

The town has selected an engineer to design a new, redundant pipeline river crossing, additional transmission pipelines and a storage facility. The plans and specifications are complete and construction on the first phase of the project was completed in 2003. Phase I consists of piping east of the Big Horn River and the river crossing.

Phase II of the project includes transmission pipeline and a storage tank west of town. Phase II construction should be completed during 2004. The transmission pipeline has been routed around the old refinery site in an effort to avoid the contaminated soil. BP Amoco, owners of the site, have agreed to pay the additional costs for this construction change.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action required.


 58. PROJECT:Greybull Highway 14 Crossings
LEVEL:New Application
SPONSOR:Town of Greybull
LOCATION:Big Horn County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level III 69 2003 II $240,000* 2008
50% Grant & 50% Loan (6%, 25 years)

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
The Town of Greybull has been ordered to relocate portions of their potable water transmission pipelines parallel to and crossing Highway 14 by the Wyoming Department of Transportation due to reconstruction activities along the highway.

The water transmission pipelines that are to be relocated are a part of the highway construction project. Construction of the highway project has begun and should be completed in early 2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action required.


 59. PROJECT:Greybull Valley Dam and Reservoir
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Greybull Valley Irrigation District
LOCATION:Park County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level III-I 28 1994 I $3,000,000*   2000
Level III 59 1996 I $37,000,000*   2000
Level III 88 2002 I $7,942,542** 2005
*75% grant, 25% loan (4%, 50 years)
**2002 Session laws reduced appropriation to $32,057,458. This is the final budget amount.

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Greybull Valley Irrigation District serves 80,000 acres of irrigated land in Park and Big Horn Counties and has experienced severe water shortages for several years. Increased storage will provide considerable agricultural and economic benefits.

The project includes a diversion dam on the Greybull River, a 4-mile supply canal, and an off-channel reservoir on a tributary of Roach Gulch, which is a tributary of the Greybull River downstream of Meeteetse. The reservoir will have a capacity of 30,000 acre feet.

The Level II study was phased. The first phase was completed in 1990 and concentrated on the hydrologic and geotechnical feasibility of the project. It was determined that the project is technically feasible. The second phase served to evaluate the costs and benefits of the two most feasible dam sites and select the preferred site. The third phase included the development of the conceptual designs and cost estimates. In 1992, contacts with the Bureau of Reclamation indicated that the project may be eligible for partial federal funding through the Small Reclamation Project Act. The sponsor and WWDC decided it would be in the best interests of both parties to delay the project and seek federal funding. However, in 1993, Dan Beard, the Commissioner of the Bureau of Reclamation, indicated that the Small Reclamation Program would be discontinued. Therefore, it was concluded that the project would have to be funded by the Water Development Program.

The estimated total cost for the proposed project was $40,000,000. Due to a lack of funds in Water Development Account I, a phased Level III recommendation was made and granted in 1994. The initial appropriation of $3,000,000 provided funding for permit procurement, land acquisition, and final design for the project. In 1994, consultants were selected by the district and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) for the proposed project. In 1996, an additional appropriation of $37,000,000 completed funding and allowed the project to proceed to construction.

The design of this project was complete in 1998. The design included extra measures to strengthen a weak supporting foundation. This delayed completion by nearly one month.

Project construction started in the summer of 1998. The supply canal was complete in December of 1999 and the Dam was complete in Spring of 2000. Lack of adequate runoff has prohibited the complete first fill and has stalled the evaluation of the dam performance. A contingency fund has been set aside, to correct deficiencies that typically arise during the initial phase of operations.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required on this project.


 60. PROJECT:Greybull Valley ID Hydro Power
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:Greybull Valley Irrigation District
LOCATION:Park/Big Horn County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 7 2002 I $60,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Greybull Valley Irrigation District wished to pursue a detailed cost analysis of placing hydropower generators at the base of their three major reservoir dams. The two-year study included an examination or the transmission requirements to get the generated power to users.

In 2003, the District Board liked the possibilities listed in the report. However, with the change in leadership in the district and a problem with electrical transmission line capacity, the Board did not feel they were ready to pursue the project this year.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends that the project be retained at a Level II-Hold status.


 61. PROJECT:Greybull Wells Rehabilitation
LEVEL:New Application
SPONSOR:Town of Greybull, Incorporated Municipality
LOCATION:Big Horn County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
In 1996, WWDC funded the drilling and testing of the Shell Well No. 3 for the Town of Greybull as part of a Level II study of the town's water supply. Wellhead pressure and artesian flow from Shell Well No. 3 have declined since its construction in 1996-1997.

In 1983, the WWDC funded the drilling and testing of the "Grey Well", located between Shell and Greybull, under the Ground Water Exploration Grant program. This well was not adequate for the town's needs, but it was later determined that the well was not completed through the target Madison Formation.

The Town of Greybull is requesting Level II funding to re-enter these wells and attempt to improve their performance. This project will also include an evaluation of ground water studies conducted in this sector of the Big Horn Basin and any new data that might be helpful in future well siting opportunities.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be incorporated into the Rehabilitation Program at Level II with an appropriation of $475,000. The appropriation includes funding for a ground water exploration program.


 62. PROJECT:Groundwater Studies
LEVEL:N/A
SPONSOR:State
LOCATION:Statewide
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
GW Grants 8 1981 I $3,000,000 N/A
GW Grants 35 1984 I $1,000,000 N/A
GW Grants 7 2002 I $1,500,000 N/A

PROJECT INFORMATION:
In 1981 the Legislature appropriated $3,000,000 to be granted to incorporated municipalities for the purpose of groundwater exploration. Grants were limited to $200,000 and a 10% match was required. Only one award could be made to a municipality. In 1984 an additional $1,000,000 was appropriated and the local share was increased to 25%. Over the years, 37 communities have benefited from this program.

During the ongoing drought, it became apparent that additional funding would be beneficial to assist municipalities and special districts address shortages in their drinking water supply. In 2002, an additional $1,500,000.00 was appropriated for the program, the grant amount was raised to a maximum of $400,000.00 per entity, and the program was expanded to include special districts.

CURRENT OBLIGATED FUNDS:
Town of Pine Bluffs : $200,000
City of Cheyenne/Board of Public Utilities : $400,000
Central Campbell County Improvement & Service District (Sleepy Hollow) : $260,000

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action required.


 63. PROJECT:Guernsey Water Supply
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:Town of Guernsey
LOCATION:Platte County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 8 1995 I $ 75,000 1996
Level III 59 1996 II $550,000 1999
Level II 125 2003 II $ 40,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
In 1994, Guernsey and Hartville submitted applications requesting assistance in evaluating water supply, treatment, storage, transmission and distribution systems. Since the two municipalities are in proximity and take water from the same source (shallow wells along the North Platte River), the Commission conducted a joint Level I Master Plan study to determine the feasibility of a regional approach to solving the area's water supply problems. The study determined that a combined system was not feasible. Two separate project reports were submitted, with separate recommendations for each community. Guernsey's existing supply source is a series of wells into the North Platte alluvium. This project included replacing one of the older and more vulnerable wells with a new production well, and provided the necessary wellhead appurtenances, controls and pipeline connections to incorporate the new well into the existing system.

In 1996 the Commission recommended that the project be advanced in the New Development Program at Level III status with a budget of $550,000. The financing plan included a 67% grant and a 33% loan at an interest rate of 4% and a term of 20 years.

In 1997 the new well was drilled and developed. Construction of the new pipeline system was delayed due to the need to comply with federal program guidelines as the project was partially funded by the federal Rural Utility Service. These remaining improvements were constructed in 1999.

In the summer of 2002, the Town of Guernsey had its water storage tank inspected. The results indicated a need for a total removal and replacement of the existing coating and removal and replacement of corroded areas. The ensuing Level II WWDC project determined that additional items were also needed for the Guernsey system upgrade. These items consist of upgrades to the SCADA system, upgrades to undersized system mains, dedicated lines from the wells to the storage tank, and an emergency system connection to the Wyoming Army Guard Camp.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be incorporated into the Rehabilitation Program at Level III with a 50% Grant of $615,000. The remaining 50% will come from RUS Loans and Grants.


 64. PROJECT:Hanover Repair
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Hanover Irrigation District
LOCATION:Washakie County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level III 69 2003 II $87,000* 2008
*100% grant for invoiced materials. The sponsor is responsible for all other project costs.

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The proposed project will rehabilitate a steel flume that was lined in the 1990's under a project financed with water development funds. The lining is deteriorating. The proposed project will serve to help assure delivery of water to the irrigators below the flume.

Sponsor elected to use funding option II, as described in SL2003, Chapter 69.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action required.


 65. PROJECT:Heart Mountain Pipe Conversion
LEVEL:New Application
SPONSOR:Heart Mountain Irrigation District
LOCATION:Park
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation

PROJECT INFORMATION:
Heart Mountain Irrigation District would like to convert two laterals in their system from open channel to PVC pipe. Lateral 28 is 14,000 feet long and serves 700 acres with 13 farm turnouts; Lateral R39 is 9,500 feet long and serves 875 acres with 6 farm turnouts. The District would like the WWDC to pay for all materials costs and the District will provide all labor, equipment, and associated costs.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be incorporated in the Rehabilitation Program at Level III with an appropriation of $602,110. This is a grant for 50% of the project costs which will pay for the materials, while the District will provide the labor, equipment and associated construction costs.


 66. PROJECT:Heart Mountain Weed Screen and Mapping
LEVEL:New Application
SPONSOR:Heart Mountain Irrigation District
LOCATION:Park
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation

PROJECT INFORMATION:
Heart Mountain Irrigation District has had ongoing problems with build up of aquatic vegetation (primarily pondweed) and windblown trash in their canals and laterals. This build up can cause numerous problems with flow measurements and flow efficiencies; and requires considerable man-hours in removal of vegetation/trash from screens and gates. The District would like a cost feasibility study of placing mechanical weed screening devices at several locations along the main canal.

The District would also like to have their system mapped digitally in a method similar to the Level II Study completed by the WWDC for the Deaver Irrigation District. This would involve mapping the main canals and laterals and each structure along with condition estimates which would be placed into a database to allow the District to modernize their maintenance schedules as well as create a living, updateable map of the District.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be incorporated in the Rehabilitation Program at Level II with an appropriation of $100,000.


 67. PROJECT:Hidden Valley Pipeline
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:Midvale Irrigation District
LOCATION:Fremont
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 7 2002 II $100,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Midvale Irrigation District requested a study to determine the feasibility of converting approximately 7 miles of an open, unlined canal known as the Hidden Valley lateral of the Pilot Canal into a gravity-pressurized pipeline serving the Hidden Valley area. Hidden Valley is located along the Wind River at the top end of Boysen Reservoir. A gravity pressurized system would serve approximately 2,200 acres and would conserve an estimated 7,000 acre-feet of water once flood irrigation is converted to sprinkler irrigation and conveyance efficiencies are increased. The study also included evaluation of re-regulation reservoir sites.

Midvale Irrigation District plans to rehabilitate the Hidden Valley conveyance system to continue their conservation program as specified in the WWDC Level II Report: Hidden Valley Pipeline Level II Feasibility Study, November 2003. The Level II Report recommends the installation of pipe to replace the existing Hidden Valley lateral open canal conveyance system. The District funding request of $1,474,103 is for the purchase of materials. Engineering, installation and permitting costs are to be provided by the District.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be incorporated into the Rehabilitation program at Level III with an appropriation of $1,474,103.


 68. PROJECT:Highline Canal
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:Shell Valley Watershed Improvement District
LOCATION:Big Horn
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 7 2002 II $50,000   2004
Level III 69 2003 II $531,000.00* 2008
50% Grant & 50% Loan (6%, 30 years)

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The WWDC recently completed a level II study of the Highline Canal that diverts from Trapper Creek. The District would like to implement the recommendations made in the study to replace the diversion structure, convert approximately 2 miles of open ditch to pipeline, and install new delivery structures. Improvements to this delivery system would benefit the irrigators along the Highline canal as well as the residents of the community of Shell. Past WWDC projects completed for the Shell Valley Watershed Improvement District include Shell Canal and Lake Adelaide.

The District needs to complete their assessment role prior to commencing the design and construction of the project, but the District is having some difficulty completing this task. The District has hired an engineer, however the design has not begun. This project should be completed during 2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required.


 69. PROJECT:High Savery Reservoir (Sandstone)
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:State of Wyoming
LOCATION:Carbon County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level III 79 1988 I $5,000,000* 1998
Level III 268 1989 I $5,000,000   1998
Level III 89 1993 I $20,400,000   1998
Level III 38 1998 I $20,400,000   2005
Level III 02 2001 I $3,8000,000   2005
*$400,000 has been allocated by statute to the Little Snake River Basin Planning Study; therefore, the total appropriation available to the project is $30,000,000. 1998 Session laws continued the $20,400,000 appropriation and extended the reversion date to 2001.

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The following paragraphs give a brief project history and update. For a more detailed description of the project history please refer to the 1999 and 2000 WWDC Legislative Report.

In 1979, the legislature enacted WS 41-2-204, which described the Stage I, II, and III transbasin diversion Projects, and "in-basin needs". The 1980 Wyoming legislature directed the WWDC to ... study the feasibility of constructing in the Little Snake River drainage above the confluence of the river and Savery Creek, a reservoir of at least 3,000 acre feet. The reservoir shall satisfy immediate in-basin agricultural, recreational, and municipal needs and shall promote in-basin water purity. In 1984, the legislature included in the WWDC project budget request criteria for a project in the Little Snake River basin. The intent was to mitigate and alleviate any water supply shortages caused by Cheyenne Stage I and Stage II projects.

The legislature in 1991 appropriated $10,000,000 for the project. Four hundred thousand dollars was earmarked for a study of alternative reservoir sites in the Little Snake River basin that would be competitive with the Sandstone site. More than 20 alternative reservoir sites were identified and assessed.

This study concluded that a small 23,000 acre-foot dam was feasible at the Sandstone site. The Savery Little Snake Water Conservancy District determined that the smaller Sandstone alternative was their preferred alternative. The legislature in 1993 appropriated an additional sum of money, which brought the total appropriation to $30,000,000.

In 1997, the legislature amended the authorization for the project from "Sandstone Dam and Reservoir Project" to "Little Snake River Valley Dam and Reservoir Project". This provided a broader definition of what could be considered mitigation for Cheyenne Stage I and Stage II transbasin diversion projects. The Stage III Transbasin Diversion Project was dropped. In July 1998, the WWDC submitted a Section 404 Permit application for the High Savery Dam and Reservoir alternative. In August 1998, the Draft EIS for the Little Snake Supplemental Irrigation Water Supply Project was published.

The High Savery alternative became the WWDC preferred alternative. In August 1999, the WWDC contracted with a consulting engineering firm to design the High Savery Dam. The Final EIS was published in October 1999.

The Section 404 permit and record of decision for construction of the High Savery Project were issued December 20, 2000. The Bureau of Land Management issued the right-of ways for roads and facilities and the State Land and Investment Board granted a permanent easement for the dam and facilities in early 2001.

On May 22, 2001, bids were opened. The low bidder was Ames Construction of Burnsville Minnesota, with a bid of $22,685,000. Notice to proceed was issued on June 22, 2001. Actual construction started soon thereafter.

During 2003, the majority of the embankment was moved into place, all concrete and mechanical work was completed. Substantial Completion was achieved on November 15, 2003. Remaining work includes telemetry, some minor wetland work, other miscellaneous work and cleanup. First fill is anticipated to begin in the Spring of 2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action required.


 70. PROJECT:Hyattville Water Supply
LEVEL:Level I
SPONSOR:Town of Hyattville - Hyattville Service & Improvement District
LOCATION:Big Horn County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 7 2002 I $75,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
In 1968, the residents of Hyattville formed the Hyattville Water Company for the purpose of developing a safe, reliable supply of water for their community. Subsequently, a deep well was drilled into the Madison Formation that flowed 100 gpm at the time of completion. Using the average daily per capita use for Wyoming (Wyoming Dept. of Environmental Quality Water Quality Division Rules & Regulations, Chapter XII, Section 8) of 125 gallons per day per person, the well could be expected to provide water for 1152 people. In reality, however, Hyattville's water system has consistently failed to deliver an adequate supply of water to the population (approx. 52) ever since it was brought online.

A WWDC Level I Master Plan was completed for Hyattville in 2002. Recommendations were generated in the final report regarding an additional groundwater supply source, for improving the distribution system, and for adding storage. A Level II feasibility study will evaluate alternatives for the new district (formerly operated as a water company). The project budget includes funding for a test well that would target the Madison Aquifer at a site near Hyattville which was identified in the Level I study.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the Hyattville Water Supply Project be incorporated into the New Development Program at Level II with an appropriation of $600,000. The appropriation includes funding for a ground water exploration program.


 71. PROJECT:Jon's Drop/4-Mile Flume Rehabilitation Project
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:West Side Canal Company/Savery-Little Snake Conservancy Dist.
LOCATION:Carbon County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 7 2002 II $25,000   2002
Level III 69 2003 II $142,000* 2008
*50% grant; 50% loan, 6%, 20 years

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The West Side Canal Company requested a Level II feasibility study to provide recommendations and cost estimates for rehabilitation of the Jons Drop and the 4-mile flume within the canal system. The Jons Drop is a chronic maintenance problem on the canal and is currently experiencing bank failure that may, if allowed to continue, disrupt water flow to irrigators below the drop. The 4-mile flume has reached its useful life expectancy and is in need of overhaul or replacement.

It was recommended that Jons Drop be rehabilitated by installing a HDPE pipe drop with a riprap energy dissipation pool. This drop will direct the flow away from the erosion area and to an area where flow can be controlled. It is recommended that 4-mile flume be replaced with an inverted siphon pipe.

The 2003 Legislature authorized Level III funding for the project. Design on the Drop rehabilitation is scheduled to be performed by the NRCS Casper office in 2004, with construction bidding to allow work on the improvements during the fall of 2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required.


 72. PROJECT:Kennington Springs Master Plan
LEVEL:I
SPONSOR:Kennington Springs Pipeline (water corporation)
LOCATION:Lincoln County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 125 2003 II $40,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The WWDC completed a Level I master plan for the Kennington Springs Pipeline Company in November 2003. The results of that study revealed several problems with their spring and pipeline that need to be corrected soon in order to avoid some potentially serious issues.

The Company would like a level II study to determine the cost of addressing these issues and the various funding scenarios available to them to help pay for the repairs. This study would also determine the feasibility of joining together with a nearby system, such as Fairview, creating a more regional system. The Company is not yet a legal entity but has drafted a resolution to pursue district formation with Lincoln County, and will be required to have the District in place prior to commencement of the level II study.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be incorporated in the Rehabilitation Program at Level II with an appropriation of $100,000.


 73. PROJECT:Kirby Creek Watershed Management Plan
LEVEL:I
SPONSOR:Hot Springs Conservation District
LOCATION:Hot Springs County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 125 2003 II $100,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Kirby Creek watershed is approximately 128,427 acres with land ownership divided among federal (50%), private (38%), and state (12%), The watershed includes one primary river system, the main stem of Kirby Creek. The Conservation District plans to look at several variables within the watershed. District constituents have concerns based on water quality issues in the Kirby Creek drainage. Specific issues identified by the District being evaluated are the effects of large run-off events, including main-stem head cutting, to the drainage. Also of interest to the district is the lack of developed upland livestock and wildlife water and impacts to riparian areas within the drainage.

This information will provide baseline information from which the District can continue to expand upon to begin implementation of management practices that address the natural resource issues within the drainage. The 2003 Legislature incorporated this project into the Rehabilitation Program at Level I with an appropriation of $175,000. The final report is due in 2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required at this time.


 74. PROJECT:Kirby Area Water Supply Study
LEVEL:New Application
SPONSOR:West Side Irrigation District
LOCATION:Big Horn and Washakie Counties
PROGRAM:New Development

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Kirby Reservoir site is located near the Washakie/Hot Springs County line. Its major purpose is to re-regulated winter releases from Boyson Reservoir. In addition it would provide a means of delivering irrigation water to irrigators in the Worland area when stream flows are not sufficient to meet water righted demand.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be incorporated in the New Development Program at Level I with an appropriation of $150,000.


 75. PROJECT:Lake DeSmet Master Plan and Reservoir Rehabilitation Plan
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:Lake DeSmet Counties Coalition, Joint Powers Board
LOCATION:Johnson County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 7 2002 II $100,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Lake DeSmet Counties Coalition, Joint Powers Board (JPB) requested assistance with planning water use and reservoir operation and a level II project was approved in 2002. The initial level II study is being completed and the JPB is requesting continued assistance in reservoir management and operation. Several issues were identified during the initial study that require follow up evaluations or continued monitoring. These issues are discussed below.

There is a need to continue seepage monitoring and inspection around the reservoir. Seepage occurs when the reservoir is filled above the 4612-foot elevation. Over the last twenty years, the reservoir has been operated at or under the 4612-foot elevation eliminating the need for seepage monitoring. However, when the reservoir is operated at full capacity the water elevation approaches elevation 4620. To take full advantage of the reservoir and the associated water rights, the JPB may wish to fill the reservoir to elevation 4620. They were unable to fill the reservoir to this level in 2002/2003 water year. There appears to be an opportunity to fill the reservoir during the 2003/2004 water year and they wish to continue the seepage monitoring effort and install weirs and addition shallow observation wells to evaluate the seepage. Continued monitoring and installation of additional monitoring equipment is estimated to cost $60,000.

The JPB wishes to conduct an inspection of the water supply tunnel from Piney Creek to the Lake. The tunnel is the main water supply for the reservoir and if it were to fail the reservoir would be greatly impacted. The tunnel is over twenty years old and internal inspections have never been completed. Investigations will require underwater inspections either by divers or by remote controlled equipment. Funds were not available to perform the underwater inspections during the initial study and the JPB requested that the tunnel investigations of be funded as part of the Phase 2 request. Estimated cost for these investigations is $75,000.

The JPB has a water right from Rock Creek for 875 acre-feet annually. The conveyance from Rock Creek to Lake DeSmet is through the Chevron/Texaco irrigation system. The JPB would like preliminary design plans prepared for conveyance of Rock Creek water. This would consist of preliminary design plans, cost estimates, and identifying environmental and landowner impacts associated with proposed improvements.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be continued in the Rehabilitation Program at Level II with an appropriation of $150,000.


 76. PROJECT:Lake Hattie Outlet Works
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:Pioneer Canal-Lake Hattie Irrigation District
LOCATION:Albany County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level III 12 1988 II $360,000 1990
Level II 7 2002 I $ 60,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
Lake Hattie is located 15 miles southwest of Laramie. Sediment carried by wind and wave action is deposited in the area of the lake's outlet which renders it inoperable. This problem increases as the level in the reservoir falls. The sediment that is carried through the outlet pipes is deposited in the canal below the dam. The sediment builds up and eventually plugs the outlet tubes. Divers have been hired in recent years to clear the sand with vacuums, but the outlets soon silt back in. In the late 1980's, the outlets were reconstructed with the emphases on the structure rather than the sedimentation problem. Pioneer Canal-Lake Hattie Irrigation District requested a Level II study to examine the rehabilitation of the outlet works with the emphases on the sedimentation problem. This project required sediment transport analysis.

In 2003, WWC Engineers examined the dam and several options to mitigate the sediment problem. The least cost option of placing an intake silo over the 1988 gates was selected by the Board.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be incorporated into the Rehabilitation Program at Level III with a 50% Grant of $81,500 and a 50% Loan of $81,500 for a total appropriation of $163,000 with terms of 6% interest for 30 years.


 77. PROJECT:Lander Paleozoic Well
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:City of Lander
LOCATION:Fremont County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 7 2002 I $40,000 2004
Level II 125 2003 I $540,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The City of Lander is presently dealing with the effects of an extended drought. Diminished flows in the Middle Fork Popo Agie River, has taxed the city's ability to provide water to their customers. Previous Level I and Level II studies explored the potential for developing supplemental and/or replacement shallow ground water sources. The effort was focused on water quality not quantity. The Paleozoic-age aquifer system (Tensleep Sandstone, Madison Limestone, Bighorn Dolomite), along the east flank of the Wind River range, may provide additional drought insurance. This aquifer system has long been recognized as having potential for providing high-quality ground water from wells that could possibly produce over 1000 gpm.

To minimize the risk to water users during dry cycles, the city requested an in-depth Phase I groundwater study that identifies an optimal location for drilling a test well that may ultimately be developed for municipal use.

The Phase I Study revealed several sites along the flank of the Wind River Range near Lander, where a Paleozoic-age Test Well could be drilled. The legislature appropriated funds for drilling a test well in 2003. Exploration drilling began in November of 2003 at a site west of Lander near the Sinks Canyon Road.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No Legislative action required.


 78. PROJECT:Laramie East Side Tank
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:City of Laramie
LOCATION:Albany County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level III 88 2002 I $3,955,000 2002
Level III 69 2003 I $825,000 2007

PROJECT INFORMATION:
A Level II study and funding for Level III design for this project was included in the Laramie North Side Water Supply Project, which was funded by the legislature in 2001 and 2002. Further information regarding the history of this project can be found under the above mentioned project in this report. The purpose of this project is to construct transmission lines, water storage facilities, and pump stations for the City of Laramie. The Level II study recommended that additional storage and new transmission lines be installed to provide a more reliable water supply to the East side of Laramie.

The level II study recommended that the completion of this project be undertaken utilizing a three phase construction process. The first phase, design, is nearly complete. During design the Engineers identified a new design alternative that resulted in a significant savings to the State of Wyoming and to the City of Laramie. This new design resulted in the elimination of the third construction phase of this project.

Phase one of this project will include the construction of the transmission lines and the tanks. Phase one was funded during the 2002 legislative session. This City of Laramie requested $825,000 for Phase II of this project. Phase II was approved during the 2003 session and included the installation of a new pump station and the rehabilitation of an existing pump station. Construction for Phase I of this project is scheduled to begin in the summer of 2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action required at this time.


 79. PROJECT:Laramie North Side Supply
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:City of Laramie
LOCATION:Albany County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 36 2000 II $45,000 2002
Level III 2 2001 II $970,000 2005
Level III 88 2002 II $3,225,000 2007

PROJECT INFORMATION:
A Master Plan was conducted for the town of Laramie in the mid 90's that evaluated various options for expanding Laramie's water supply. These options included improvements to the storage, treatment, transmission and distribution system, which are needed to meet expanding demands. This master plan also recommended a long-term schedule for improving both the surface and groundwater supply systems. Recommendations were made for Level III construction funding from both the New Development and Rehabilitation accounts.

Following the completion of the previously mentioned master plan the New Development Program funded the conversion of an existing test well to production status and the construction of monitoring wells at the LaPrele site. Subsequent recommendations provided for the construction of two production wells at the Spur site, a pipeline to connect the spur well to the city distribution system, and a new storage tank.

The 2000 legislature authorized funding for the Laramie North Side Supply Level II Study. This study included an evaluation of the 20 inch pipeline south and west of town, identification of alternatives to provide increased storage to East Laramie, suggested solutions to the system deficiencies in the Corthell Hills area, and lastly an evaluation of the system short comings and recommend alternatives for providing water service to the North Laramie area.

The Level II Study authorized by the 2000 legislature recommended that the City of Laramie rehabilitate the previously mentioned 20 inch pipeline, and add a tank and additional transmission lines in East Laramie to provide water for the Corthell Hill and Altavista areas. These projects should be finished in 2005.

Level III Design funding was appropriated during the 2001 legislative session. It included the design of the 20 inch pipeline rehabilitation and the tank and transmission line installation on the east side of town. During the 2002 legislative session the City of Laramie requested that funding for the construction of the 20 inch line rehabilitation be separated from the funding for the improvements on the east side of Laramie. The rehabilitation of the 20" pipeline was funded as the Laramie North Side Supply Project. The second much larger piece of the project, the installation of a new tank and transmission line on the East side of Laramie, was funded as the Laramie East Side Tank Project. Construction for the Laramie North Side Supply Project is scheduled to for completion in early 2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action required at this time.


 80. PROJECT:LeClair Laterals
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:LeClair Irrigation District
LOCATION:Fremont County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 7 2002 II $50,000   2004
Level III 69 2003 II $650,000* 2008
*Material costs only

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The LeClair Irrigation District would like to rehabilitate a number of their laterals in an effort to continue their conservation program as outlined initially in the WWDC Level I Report: Wind River Study: LeClair Canal and Riverton Valley (Wyoming No. 2 Canal Rehabilitation), March 1993. The study suggested piping of open-ditch laterals in a phased approach, allowing the District to implement improvements in a prioritized sequence. A subsequent 1994 Level III project began the process of installing the pipe, with WWDC financing the cost of materials and the district providing the labor for installation. Easement and access issues significantly slowed the progress of installation of pipe by the district. The district believes that it has now resolved these issues. A Level II engineering study was recently completed to update project costs from the 1993 study and to include seven additional laterals. This 2002 study recommended the installation of pipe in twelve open laterals and provided a revised estimate for rehabilitation costs totaling $1,130,000.

The 2003 Legislature authorized Level III funding for the lateral rehabilitation, providing for the reimbursement of project materials. Rehabilitation construction will be performed during the non-irrigation season following canal shut off in September for the years 2004-2007.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required.


 81. PROJECT:Lingle Water Supply Phase II
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Town of Lingle
LOCATION:Goshen County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 82 1998 I $ 40,000   2000
Level III 16 1999 II $400,000* 2003
Level III 88 2002 II $711,000* 2007
*50% grant, 50% loan (7.25%, 30 years)

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The town utilizes three shallow wells and two storage tanks as their water supply source. Their water system is quite old, and portions are in poor condition. The main part of town is fed by 4 inch lines from a 50,000 gallon, 1928 vintage storage tank. The much smaller new section of town is feed from a new 126,000 gallon storage tank.

Level III funding authorized in 1999 replaced the 6 inch line from the tank to the north edge of the older part of town with an 8 inch pipeline and replaced 4 inch lines through the center of town with 8 inch lines. The 1928 storage tank was removed from service. The most recent request would install 8 inch pipe in the southern part of town and would finance construction of a new storage tank to a higher elevation. The pipe installation is under construction and should be completed in the summer of 2004. The new storage tank is anticipated to be bid and completed in 2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action required.


 82. PROJECT:Little Snake River Dams, Grieve and Cottonwood Creek Dams
LEVEL:Level II
SPONSOR:Little Snake River Conservation District
LOCATION:Carbon County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 7 2002 II $80,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
In 2003, Gannett Fleming completed a study of three potential dam sites in the Little Snake River basin for the WWDC and the conservancy district. The district has requested that two of the sites, Upper Cottonwood and Grieve, be advanced to level III. They are also seeking federal funding through the P.L. 566 program for the proposed projects and the Water Development Commission funding should be contingent on getting the federal funding.

Grieve Reservoir was an existing reservoir which washed out in 1984. The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) developed a plan and designs in 1986 for reconstructing the reservoir up stream of its original location. As part to the 2003 study Gannett Fleming reviewed the plans and designs and found them to be suitable and up dated the costs. The reconstructed reservoir would impound approximately 317 acre-feet. The water yield is fairly certain because a ditch supplies the reservoir. Approximately 445 acres are permitted to be irrigated from the reservoir.

Upper Cottonwood Creek Reservoir was first evaluated when alternatives were being considered in the Sandstone/High Savery Project. Gannett Fleming in the 2003 study made additional evaluations and up dated the estimated costs for this proposed site. They estimated a reservoir could be constructed that would impound about 1,000 acre-feet. They used regional curves and estimates to evaluate the storage and yield for the reservoir, and no geotechnical evaluations were undertaken at this site. Therefore, before final plans and designs can be completed, additional hydrology studies and geotecnical work should be finalized.

The project will now be referred to as the Grieve and Cottonwood Creek Dams Project.
     CHAPTER II
     CHAPTER III Grieve Reservoir Estimated Level III Costs
     CHAPTER IV Phase 1 Costs
Design and Permitting$67,350
     CHAPTER V
     CHAPTER VI Phase 2 Costs
Mobilization and Site Preparation$100,580
Embankment and Filters$87,100
Riprap$29,200
Concrete Work and Pipe$11,742
Gates, Trash Racks, etc.$12,300
Drains$4,325
Emergency Spillway$3,750
Engineering (10%)$24,900
Contingency (15%)$41,085
Total Project Cost$382,332
Rounded$383,000
 
     CHAPTER VII Upper Cottonwood Creek Reservoir Level III Costs
     CHAPTER VIII Phase 1 Costs
Designs and Permitting$796,600
     CHAPTER IX Phase 2 Costs
Mobilization and Site Preparation$210,000
Foundation Excavation$175,000
Embankment and Filters$977,000
Riprap$390,000
Toe Drain and Backfill$52,000
Outlet Works$1,200,000
Emergency Spillway$540,000
Move County Road$100,000
Engineering (10%)$364,400
Contingency (15%)$601,260
Total Project Cost$5,406,260
Rounded$5,407,000
 
Total Estimated Project$5,800,000

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends that the project be incorporated into the New Development Program at Level III with an appropriation of $2,900,000. The remaining $2,900,000 will come from federal funding.


 83. PROJECT:Little Snake River Small Dams and Reservoirs Phase II
LEVEL:Level III
SPONSOR:Little Snake River Conservation District
LOCATION:Carbon County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level III 88 2002 I 500,000* 2007
*60% grant, 40% Loan (6.0%, 25 years)

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The 1999 Water Development Omnibus Construction legislation authorized $215,000 for the purpose of building from one to twelve small dams and reservoirs to improve range and grazing conditions in the area. The total estimated volume of water impounded by the twelve reservoirs would be approximately 2,636 acre-feet and will service a total area of 9,780 acres of rangeland. Construction of the 12 dams was initially estimated to be in the range of $2,254,650.

With the first appropriation of $215,000, design on three dams was completed along with the purchase of spillway piping, outlet and inlet materials for two dams and the construction of a single dam and reservoir. An additional $50,000 was included in the 2000 Water Development Omnibus Construction legislation to allow the completion of construction on the second dam and reservoir site. The cost for the design, construction and engineering inspection of the two dams and reservoirs is approximately $1,670 per acre-foot.

The district has been instrumental in substantially lowering the overall project costs by undertaking the securing of permits from the Corps of Engineers, the DEQ Water Quality Division, the State Engineer's Office and the Bureau of Land Management.

The 2002 legislative session appropriated an additional $500,000 to continue the design and construction of four additional dams and reservoirs from the original list of twelve dams and reservoirs identified as being economically viable and feasible to construct. The dams/reservoirs include: Brown's Hill 21, Garden Gulch 3, Garden Gulch 32, and Ketchum Buttes 34. The four dams are estimated to provide over 425 acre-feet of storage capacity.

In order to qualify for Water Development Program funding, the Little Snake River Conservation District must provide sufficient collateral to secure the loan. The current appropriation provides for a $200,000 loan and a $300,000 grant. Collateral has been established in the form of an escrow account in the Rawlins National Bank with a current balance of over $202,500.

During 2002, initial permitting activities and geotechnical drilling was undertaken by the Sponsor. Construction on the first reservoir is anticipated to begin during the spring of 2004.

Since the sites are located on BLM lands, maintenance of the currently constructed dams and reservoirs is being assumed by the Bureau of Land Management under operating agreements between the BLM and the district. Maintenance of additional dams and reservoirs constructed will be handled in a similar manner.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required.


 84. PROJECT:McNutt Water Supply
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:McNutt Improvement District
LOCATION:Washakie County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 82 1998 I $25,000 2000

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The City of Worland installed a new water line to the Boy's School several years ago that passes very near to the sponsor's service area. At the time that line was constructed, the city installed a tap to accommodate the sponsor's future plans for a water system.

The sponsor requested assistance to complete a rural water system for their subdivision. A Level II study was performed in 1998 which shows the project to be feasible, and that monthly water bills will be approximately $50/tap/month. The total project cost is estimated at $165,000, with $102,000 of that amount eligible for WWDC participation.

There are currently about 45 people living in the service area, with a number of unoccupied lots. They predict there will be 20 taps on their system initially, and are confident that additional requests will be made for taps once the system moves forward. The sponsor currently utilizes individual wells of marginal quality, and septic systems.

The project has been incorporated into the Washakie Rural Water Supply Project, and advanced to Level III in the New Development Program with an appropriation of $60,000 as part of the appropriation for the Washakie Rural Water Supply project.

This portion of the Washakie Rural Improvement and Service District's system should be completed during 2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required.


 85. PROJECT:Mead Creek Ditch Rehabilitation (Prairie Dog Watershed Plan)
LEVEL:I
SPONSOR:Sheridan County Conservation District
LOCATION:Sheridan County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 36 2000 I $100,000 2002

PROJECT INFORMATION:
This proposed Mead Creek Ditch Rehabilitation project developed from the Prairie Dog Creek Watershed Level I Master Plan (Prairie Dog Creek Watershed Master Plan Level I Study, November 2001, EnTech, Inc. for the WWDC). The Sheridan County Conservation District and the major ditch companies in the area sponsored the level I master plan.

As part of the level I study, three ditches that divert flow from North and South Piney Creeks into the Prairie Dog Creek basin were studied. The ditch companies include: Prairie Dog Water Supply Company, Piney and Cruse Creek Ditch Company, and the Mead Creek Ditch Company.

Over the years the transbasin diversions across Tunnel Hill have caused considerable erosion and down cutting. Affecting both the operation of the ditches and the environment. The Mead Creek Ditch currently diverts water from North Piney Creek and moves it into the Prairie Dog Creek drainage via a 36-inch pipe and "drop". The "drop" entails a 150-foot waterfall. This fall has caused considerable erosion and transport of sediment, which causes both operational problems in the irrigation system and water quality problems.

This study would expand upon the level I baseline information to develop rehabilitation plans for the drop and to mitigate the erosion and sedimentation problems. The study would also look at other opportunities for rehabilitation and improvements within the full length of the irrigation system. The Mead Creek Ditch Company is in the process of forming a watershed improvement district. The project cannot be initiated until the district is formed.

The project will be referred to as the Mead Creek Ditch Level II Study from this point forward.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be incorporated into the Rehabilitation Program at Level I with an appropriation of $75,000.


 86. PROJECT:Middle Fork Dam
LEVEL:II-Hold
SPONSOR:State of Wyoming
LOCATION:Johnson County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 10 1994 I Hold   1996
Level II 15 1996 I Hold   1998
Level II 82 1998 I Hold   2000
Level II 36 2000 I Hold   2002
Level II 7 2002 I Hold* 2004
*A block appropriation of $15,000 was made for all hold projects

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The proposed project would be located on the Middle Fork of the Powder River. The Middle Fork Reservoir would have a total capacity of 59,600 acre-feet, of which 47,700 acre-feet would be active storage for water supply and the remaining 11,900 acre-feet would serve as a minimum pool for fisheries and recreation purposes. The project would yield 32,200 acre-feet per year for industrial, agricultural and instream flow purposes. The project would cost approximately $60,000,000. In 1990, WWDC completed negotiations to obtain an interest in the reservoir permits from the Powder River Reservoir Corporation (PRRC).

The transfer required a separate contract between EXXON U.S.A. and WWDC. EXXON has invested about 1.5 million dollars in the project and has a contract with the PRRC, which had to be addressed before the state can proceed toward construction of the project. The Commission contracted with the USGS for a study of water quality parameters in the Powder River drainage. This report was completed in 1992.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends that the project be retained at Level II-Hold status.


 87. PROJECT:Midvale Conservation Program
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:Midvale Irrigation District
LOCATION:Fremont County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 125 2003 II $300,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Midvale Irrigation District requested a feasibility Level II study to determine potential water savings that could be realized by converting the entire irrigation project to: (1) underground pipelines, (2) underground pipeline/canal lining combination, or (3) some other form of water conveyance improvements that would be more efficient than that currently in use. This study includes a detailed inventory and assessment of structures/facilities currently in use, seepage and evaporation loss studies of all canals and laterals, proposed alternative methods to improve water conveyance, and estimated costs of such improvements. Improvements to this irrigation system are to be implemented over a 10 to 20 year time period as an ongoing construction effort that would minimize financial impacts to the District water users.

The WWDC Level II Report: Hidden Valley Pipeline Level II Feasibility Study, November 2003 investigated re-regulation storage sites. The Sand Gulch Re-Regulation Reservoir (1,160 AF) was recommended for further evaluation specifically to include a geotechnical investigation, assessment of specific permitting requirements and evaluate land acquisition costs pertinent to this project. It is estimated that these additional studies will cost approximately $75,000.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be continued in the Rehabilitation program at Level II with an appropriation of $75,000.


 88. PROJECT:Moorcroft Well
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Town of Moorcroft
LOCATION:Crook County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 38 1992 I $35,000   1992
Level II 74 1994 I $225,000   1994
Level III 28 1994 I $930,000* 1997
Level II 36 2000 I $355,000   2002
Level II 86 2001 I $145,000   2002
Level III 69 2003 I $2,250,000** 2008
*67% grant, 33% loan (4%, 30 years)
**60% grant

PROJECT INFORMATION:
In 1992, a Level I study conducted for the town of Moorcroft recommended construction of a new storage tank and connection piping collection system. The study also recommended that both a Lance/Fox Hills Formation well and a Madison Formation well be developed. In 1994, after the conclusion of a Level II study, the town of Moorcroft constructed the new storage tank, system piping, and drilled a new Lance/Fox Hills test well. The Madison test well was completed in 2001 to a total depth of 3,750 feet and produced 600 gpm during the pump test.

The 2003 funding from WWDC to connect the Madison well to the town's water distribution system has been secured for 60% of project costs. The sponsor is securing the balance of the project funding. When all of the funding is secured the sponsor will proceed with hiring an engineer for design services.

When the project is completed and the well is placed into service, the sponsor will be obligated to make amortized (6.0% interest, 30 years) payments on $129,031.40, which represents 40% of the cost of the Madison Well completed in Level II.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action required.


 89. PROJECT:Newcastle Area Water Supply
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:City of Newcastle
LOCATION:Weston County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 15 1996 I $100,000   1998
Level II 46 1997 I $500,000   2000
Level II 82 1998 I $140,000   2000
Level II 81 1999 I $420,000   2000
Level III 96 2000 I $1,320,000* 2004
*60% grant, 40% loan (7.25%, 30 years)

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
The city of Newcastle received a loan and grant appropriation for construction of a water storage tank, pressure reducing valve stations, and transmission pipelines to improve the municipal water system and its ability to provide service to neighboring entities, e.g. Cambria, West End, Salt Creek, and Blacktail. Regional solutions were explored in the 1999 Level II study, which also provided for the drilling of a Madison formation well for the Salt Creek Water District.

The construction contract for pressure reducing valve stations and booster pump station is essentially complete. During construction it was determined that by adding one more booster pump and opening a valve to allow the booster pumps to reduce the head on both Well No. 1 and Well No. 4, that possibly production from Well No. 4 could be increased to the point that the new storage tank and appurtenant pipelines would not be needed now. The additional booster pump will be installed and system performance monitored during 2004. Design and construction of the transmission pipeline from the booster pump station to the existing water storage tank no. 1 is anticipated in 2004.

Due to easement negotiations for the new transmission pipeline and conclusion of the booster pump contract, more time is needed to complete the project. Therefore the sponsor is requesting an extension of the reversion date to July 1, 2007. It is anticipated the new storage tank will not be built, so the original project funding is adequate.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the reversion date for project funding be amended to be July 1, 2007.


 90. PROJECT:Nine Mile Water Supply
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Nine Mile Water and Sewer District
LOCATION:Albany County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 82 1998 I $20,000   2000
Level II 81 1999 I $30,000   2000
Level III 96 2000 I $920,000* 2004
*60% grant; 40% loan (7.25%, 20 years)

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Nine Mile water users are currently hauling water from Laramie to their storage tanks. One user has 1000 gallons per week hauled to her home at a rate of approximately $90.00 per month. The groundwater is not usable in the area due to high chemical content. In addition to not having drinking water, there isn't a water supply available in the area to suppress fires. Two major fires occurred in the Nine Mile area in 1996.

The Nine Mile residents formed a water and sewer district in 1998. They have also contacted the City of Laramie to find out if they could purchase water from the city. However, before the City of Laramie would agree to provide the requested water service, questions had to be answered concerning system operation and the capacity of the systems needed to be evaluated.

The 1998 Level I project reviewed the supply and distribution options, analyzed the Laramie water supply system capabilities and estimated the costs to connect to the water system. This analysis also looked at the nearby Seven Mile area, already being served by the Laramie water system.

The 1999 Level II project refined the Nine Mile system design and cost estimates, examined the possibility of a joint system with other local water users and examined the supply options from the city of Laramie.

The 2000 Level III authorization provides funds for final design and construction of a water main system for the Nine Mile District that will include taps to the two main Laramie pipelines, control house, a buster pump station, and transmission mains. Construction on the water system was substantially completed by June 2003. The project will be closed out in 2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required.


 91. PROJECT:North Alpine Water Supply/North Alpine Rehabilitation
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:North Alpine Improvement & Service District
LOCATION:Lincoln
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 7 2002 II $60,000 2004
Level III 69 2003 II $257,000 2008

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The District would like to pursue the recommendations outlined in the level II study recently completed in October 2002. The level II study recommended drilling a new well to replace a smaller existing well, which is located in the crawl space of an outbuilding of a private residence, replacing the existing storage tank, and replacing the existing transmission line from the wells to the storage tank.

A consulting engineer has been assigned and design work has begun. It is anticipated that the project will be ready to bid by summer of 2004 and that construction will commence that same year.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is needed.


 92. PROJECT:North Canal - Grover
LEVEL:I
SPONSOR:North Canal Irrigation Company
LOCATION:Lincoln
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 125 2003 II $60,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
North Canal Irrigation Company diverts 40.38 cfs out of Swift Creek near Afton. The Company holds a territorial water right to this appropriation but due to an aged infrastructure the Company has difficulty delivering water to its irrigators. The Level I reconnaissance study will analyze options available to the Company to improve their system.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No further legislative action is required at this time.


 93. PROJECT:North Cheyenne Master Plan
LEVEL:II-Hold
SPONSOR:Laramie County Commission
LOCATION:Laramie County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 10 1994 I Hold   1996
Level II 15 1996 I Hold   1998
Level II 82 1998 I Hold   2000
Level II 36 2000 I Hold   2002
Level II 7 2002 I Hold* 2004
*A total appropriation of $15,000 is available for hold projects.

PROJECT INFORMATION:
Water levels in domestic and stock wells in the north Cheyenne area have been decreasing. There are approximately 1,500 residences in the north Cheyenne area with a population of approximately 5,000 people. The area encompasses approximately 30 square miles. All the residences are served by individual wells and waste water is treated with individual septic systems. In 1991, the Laramie County Commissioners requested a Level I planning study to develop a master plan for the north Cheyenne area. The request was initiated in response to complaints of residents concerning reduced water levels in wells and possible water quality degradation.

In 1992, the WWDC contracted with a consultant to complete a Level I water supply master plan study of the north Cheyenne area. The study was completed in 1993 and identified several water supply alternatives. Reconnaissance level designs and cost estimates were prepared for a system that would utilize groundwater as a water source, a rural water supply system with transmission capacity to address future growth using water supplied by the Cheyenne Board of Public Utilities, and a water supply system with limited transmission capacity using water supplied by the Cheyenne Board of Public Utilities. In addition, water conservation, aquifer recharge and no action alternatives were also evaluated. The Level I report concluded that the preferred alternative is to purchase water from the City of Cheyenne and to systematically construct a transmission pipeline system to accommodate existing and future water supply needs. The cost of a water supply system built to the City of Cheyenne standards is about $45 per household per month. Each landowner would also have to finance approximately $14,000 needed to connect to the main water supply lines and to build an internal water distribution system.

The project was terminated at the conclusion of the Phase I work program because several issues (annexation, property owner interest) had to be resolved before additional technical work can be performed. In all probability, the interest in the project will vary throughout the area and the ultimate project will be phased based upon that interest.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The Commission recommends the project be retained at Level II-Hold status.


 94. PROJECT:Northeast Wyoming Interactive Database
LEVEL:I
SPONSOR:Wyoming Geological Survey
LOCATION:Northeast Wyoming
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 86 2001 I $400,000 2003

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The coalbed methane development in the Powder River Basin is currently one of the most active in the U.S., with more than 2,400 producing wells. These wells collectively produced 58.1 billion cubic feet of gas in 1999. There are also 1,300 shut-in wells capable of producing once they are connected to a pipeline. The average water production per well is approximately 12 gpm, which equates to approximately 40 mgd. This water is typically discharged to the surface. Over 7,200 additional wells have been permitted in the last year, with BLM projecting that a total of 35,000 to 70,000 cbm wells may ultimately be completed.

The purpose of the proposed project is to generate an interactive database that will provide information on the surficial and subsurface geology, groundwater hydrology, and surface and subsurface water quality of part of the Powder River Basin. The study will be completed in cooperation with cooperative efforts the Wyoming Geological Survey, the Water Resources Data System, the United States Geological Survey- Water Resources Division, the Bureau of Land Management, the Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, the Wyoming Water Development Commission, the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality, and the Wyoming State Engineer's Office.

The project is proposed to be completed by June of 2004, with subsequent appropriation requests for the other basins in the State.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action required.


 95. PROJECT:Northern Arapaho Ground Water Development
LEVEL:New Application
SPONSOR:Joint Business Council of the Eastern Shoshone and Northern Arapaho Tribes
LOCATION:Fremont County
PROGRAM:New Development

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
The Ethete area water system (operated by Northern Arapaho Utilities Organization) relies solely upon highly variable (both in quantity and quality) surface water diverted from the Little Wind River. Low flows due to irrigation demands in the summer and natural low flows in the winter often leave Arapaho Utilities unable to divert enough water to meet domestic water needs. High turbidities during runoff and after the South Fork II fire (June 2002) have also caused significant operational problems, which reinforces the need for a reliable ground water source of domestic water.In addition, existing ground water supplies in the Arapahoe service area and Industrial Park are insufficient to meet projected future demands.

WWDC funding is requested to further investigate the feasibility of developing available groundwater resources, drill wells at locations identified in the feasibility study, and develop a Master Plan for Northern Arapaho Utilities to prioritize needed infrastructure improvements.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be incorporated into the New Development Program at Level II with an appropriation of $700,000.


 96 PROJECT:North Uinta/Bear River Water Supply
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:North Uinta County Improvement & Service District
LOCATION:Uinta County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 81 1999 I $40,000 2000
Level II 86 2001 I $100,000 2002
Level III 69 2003 I $580,000 2008

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The North Uinta County Improvement & Service District (NUCISD) is located 10 miles north of Evanston. The district consists of six different sections, Whitney Canyon, El Caballo 1, El Caballo 2, Lower Deer Mountain, Upper Deer Mountain 1, and Upper Deer Mountain 2. In June of 2001, these entities joined and incorporated into the Town of Bear River. During the Level I study, one of the two supply wells for the Deer Mountain subdivision began to fail. The district/town needed to drill a well in the Deer Mountain area to replace the failing well.

A successful test well was drilled in 2002 during the Level II Study. The Town acquired emergency State Land & Investment Board funding to tie the well into the existing system and applied to WWDC for 2003 Level III funding for a new tank and transmission line.

The town was awarded a $290,000 loan and a $ 290,000 grant by the 2003 legislature to complete the project. The appropriation was predicated upon the condition that the size of the storage installed is to be downsized if the Town of Bear River and the Town of Evanston cannot coordinate a water supply to serve a regional constituency.

The two entities are discussing whether a regional system is appropriate. An engineer has been selected and design work will commence in 2004. At some time a decision will have to be made as to the size of storage to be constructed.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required.


 97. PROJECT:NW Rural Water Storage
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Northwest Rural Water District
LOCATION:Park and Big Horn Counties
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level III 69 2003 I $1,120,000* 2008
*50% grant, 50% loan (6%, 30 years)

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The proposed project includes installation of water storage tanks at five locations within the Northwest Rural Water District water delivery system. The relatively new system was designed for limited growth, knowing that as users were added additional storage would be required. The number of users in certain service areas have increased to the point where additional storage is needed. The proposed project will serve to extend the time water is available to users during interruptions in supply.

In 2003 the sponsor held an election to incur the project loan debt, executed legal documents, and hired an engineer for design and inspection services. The project is being designed and land rights are being negotiated.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action required.


 98. PROJECT:Owl Creek Irrigation District Master Plan
LEVEL:I
SPONSOR:Owl Creek Irrigation District
LOCATION:Hot Springs County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 125 2003 II $150,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Owl Creek Irrigation District is incorporated with the Wyoming Secretary of State's Office. The District's water supply is made up from a combination of Owl Creek direct flow water, storage water from Anchor Dam and pumped water from the Bighorn River. Owl Creek Irrigation District has three separate areas known as upper and middle serving 9,282 acres and Lucerne serving 3,997 acres. The upper and middle areas are dependent largely on direct flow supplies and storage from an active account in Anchor Dam of approximately 18,000 acre feet. The Lucerne area delivers pumped water from two lift stations through approximately 33 miles of conveyance system. The purpose of this study is to conduct a watershed evaluation of the Owl Creek drainage with emphasis on storage possibilities for the upper and middle areas and potential water conservation measures for Lucerne. The 2003 Legislature incorporated this project into the Rehabilitation Program at Level I with an appropriation of $150,000. The final report is due in 2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required at this time.


 99. PROJECT:Pine Bluffs Brule Formation Water Supply
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Town of Pine Bluffs
LOCATION:Laramie County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level III 69 2003 II $250,000** 2008
**50% grant, 50% loan (6%, 30 years)

PROJECT INFORMATION:
During the summer of 2002, the Town of Pine Bluffs experienced critical water shortages due to extreme drought conditions. Substantial decline in the water table of the Brule Formation aquifer has been experienced in all wells in southeastern Laramie County. The Town's Municipal Well #5 has failed and the town procured WWDC Ground Water Exploration Grant funding in Fall 2002 to drill a replacement well. A successful test well was discovered and will serve as a replacement well for Well #5. The 2003 Level III funding to install pumping equipment and tie the new well into the town system was appropriated by the legislature and secured by the sponsor in 2003. The project is being designed and construction is anticipated to be complete in 2004.

See the Pine Bluffs Water Supply narrative for more explanation of the Level I and II efforts.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action required.


 100. PROJECT:Pine Bluffs Lance-Fox Hills Test Well
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:Town of Pine Bluffs, Incorporated Municipality
LOCATION:Laramie County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 10 1994 I $75,000   1996
Level II 8 1995 I $150,000   1996
Level III 96 2000 I $1,245,000* 2004
*60% grant, 40% loan (7.25%, 20 years)

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Town of Pine Bluffs has depended solely on ground water supplied from shallow wells completed in the Brule Member of the White River Formation. The complexity of the aquifer and its vulnerability to nearby agricultural land use has guided the town to seek potential alternative aquifer sources. Underlying the White River Formation in southeastern Wyoming is the Upper Cretaceous-Age Lance Formation and Fox Hills Sandstone that have been developed elsewhere in Wyoming and the Denver Basin (Lance Formation equivalents in Colorado are Arapahoe and Laramie Formations) for drinking water supplies. A Lance aquifer well near Pine Bluffs (Lodgepole Valley Potatoes/Diamond Hill Farms well) has tested favorably for water quality and a deep test well drilled in February 2003 (WWDC Ground Water Exploration Grant Program) showed potential water sands at various intervals to a 995' total depth.

The goal of this Level II investigation is to drill a production size test well to fully penetrate and test the Lance-Fox Hills aquifer system at Pine Bluffs.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be incorporated into the New Development Program at Level II with an appropriation of $475,000.


 101. PROJECT:Pine Bluffs Supply
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Town of Pine Bluffs
LOCATION:Laramie County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 10 1994 I $75,000   1996
Level II 8 1995 I $150,000   1996
Level III 96 2000 I $1,245,000* 2004
*60% grant, 40% loan (7.25%, 20 years)

PROJECT INFORMATION:
A Level I study funded by the WWDC recommended construction of a transmission line, which would connect the town's wells directly to their storage tanks. This would accommodate construction of a single disinfection system at the tank, rather than installing disinfection systems at each well. In 1995, a Level II study also looked at rehabilitation of the town's existing wells, and updated Level I results for constructing the above referenced transmission pipeline. A 1996 Level III construction project replaced one well (see Completed Construction Projects section near the back of the book). The 2000 Level III appropriation funded construction of the "wells to storage" transmission line to allow the town to more efficiently disinfect their water supply.

Construction of the transmission pipeline and appurtenances is complete.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action required.


 102. PROJECT:Pine Haven Madison Well
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Town of Pine Haven
LOCATION:Crook County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 36 2000 I $35,000   2001
Level II 7 2002 I $575,000   2004
Level III 69 2003 I $115,000* 2008
*50% grant

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The "Town of Pine Haven Water System Master Plan," completed by Stetson Engineering in 2000, recommended that a second water well be developed to meet increased demands associated with growth and development and to provide system redundancy. The town currently has only one source of supply, the Keyhole No. 1 Well. If this well should fail, the community would be out of water as soon as the storage tank emptied. To increase the reliability of service to the water system, it would be advantageous to have a second supply well. A successful Madison Formation Aquifer test well was drilled and tested in August/September of 2002.

The 2003 Level III funding is to connect the new Madison Well to the water system. In 2003 the sponsor secured WWDC funding for 50% of project costs. The sponsor is securing the balance of the project funding. When all of the funding is secured the sponsor will proceed with hiring an engineer for design services.

When the project is completed and the well is placed into service, the sponsor will be obligated to make amortized (6.0% interest, 30 years) payments on $144,847.45, which represents 50% of the cost of the Madison Well completed in Level II.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action required.


 103. PROJECT:Platte-Goshen Regional Master Plan
LEVEL:I
SPONSOR:City of Torrington
LOCATION:Goshen and Platte Counties
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 125 2003 I $150,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
Numerous communities in the Platte and Goshen Counties area have experienced problems with water quality from nitrates, radionuclides, coliform, etc. This project will look at alternate supply sources and transmission systems necessary for regional water use in this area. This is a two-year study.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required.


 104. PROJECT:Powell Master Plan/Powell Water Supply Rehabilitation
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:City of Powell
LOCATION:Park County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 36 2000 II $45,000 2002
Level III 2 2001 II $127,000 2005
Level III 88 2002 II $785,000 2007
Level III 69 2003 II $51,000 2007

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The sponsor would like to move forward with the recommended improvements to their water system as outlined in the Level I study funded by the WWDC in 2000. The Level I study recommended replacing the old 75,000 gallon elevated storage tank with a 400,000 elevated tank in the southwest part of the city. This new storage tank will meet the storage needs of the sponsor well into the future.

A new pressure zone is needed in Powell to increase marginal pressures in the western part of the city. Four pressure reducing valves and associated piping are also needed to complete the pressure zone. Phase 1 consists of designing the project, compiling specifications, securing construction permits and securing rights of way.

Phase 2 will include the pressure reducing valves and piping construction. Phase 3 will include the construction of the storage tank and telemetry system.

Due to limited WWDC funds the project received $ 127,000 in 2001 for design services only. The sponsor received $ 785,000 in 2002 for construction of the new water storage tank. All funding was matched by the sponsor. Because of the lead-time necessary for tank delivery, the tank was bid first with appurtenances to follow.

In August 2002, the sponsor's existing elevated storage tank was inspected. The interior of the tank was found to be in need of recoating, but the exterior was in acceptable condition. Since tank painters will be onsite to paint the new storage tank, the sponsor would like to include recoating of the old tanks in the Project. This will save the sponsor and state the cost of mobilization at a later date.

In 2003, the sponsor was given $51,000 to complete the existing tank repairs.

The engineer has now completed design work for the control vaults and appurtenances and finds that some modifications to the original concept have resulted in an increase to the overall budget. For this reason the sponsor is requesting an additional $ 200,000 to be matched by the sponsor to allow completion of the final phase of the project.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be continued in the Rehabilitation Program at Level III with an appropriation of $200,000. The financing plan is a 50% grant, $200,000, and 50% to be secured by the sponsor through other sources.


102.PROJECT:Pursel Acres Water Project
LEVEL:I
SPONSOR:Pursel Lands Improvement & Service District
LOCATION:Natrona County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 7 2002 I $100,000 2004
Level III 69 2003 I $341,000 2008

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The recently completed South Garden Creek Level I Study looked at the potential of adding the area south of Casper (and alongside Casper Mountain) to the City of Casper's public water supply system. Five unique service areas were identified in the Level I Study, including: Squaw Creek/Wolf Creek, South Garden Creek, Elkhorn Valley, Coates Road and Pursel Lands. The preferred water supply source for the Pursel Lands service area was identified as the City of Casper water system as an outside City retail water customer. The main City supply will be provided from a 12-inch transmission pipeline constructed under the highway from the Skyline Ranches area. Two other connections will be made to 6-inch and 8-inch water lines in Red Butte Village.

The 2003 legislature appropriated $341,000 or 50% of the eligible cost for this project The district has thus far been unsuccessful in its attempts obtain funding for the remaining 50% of the project.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No Legislative action required.


106.PROJECT:Rafter J Rehabilitation
LEVEL:Level III
SPONSOR:Rafter J Improvement and Service District and Teton County
LOCATION:Teton County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 46 1997 II $ 60,000 1998
Level III 69 2003 II $ 510,000 2008

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Rafter J Improvement and Service District has a population of approximately 2,500 people. The community has a water supply system supplied by two wells and a 200,000 gallon storage tank. The system serves 500 homes and 25 commercial taps. The system was originally designed to include three wells and an additional tank. The existing system is inadequate and cannot meet demands during the summer. The district would like to drill another well and provide additional storage.

The community formed their district in 1998, and a Level II evaluation was completed. The Level III funding request was approved in 2003. The district has contracted with an engineering firm and design of the project has begun. Most of the project should be in place by the end of 2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is needed.


 107. PROJECT:Ranchester Master Plan
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:Town of Ranchester, Incorporated Municipality
LOCATION:Sheridan
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 7 2002 II $75,000 2004
Level II 125 2003 II $80,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Town of Ranchester requested a feasibility and cost analysis of the recommendations outlined in the level I study completed in October 2002. These recommendations include evaluation of a new infiltration gallery upstream of Fivemile and Wolf Creeks, and further evaluation of water treatment processes used for taste and odor control and disinfection. The scope of work is contingent on the success of the Dayton well that is currently being drilled. If an adequate supply is found, Ranchester's needs will be met with a regional pipeline supplied by the Dayton well. The study would then be downsized to only address conveyance issues, emergency power issues and water storage issues.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No further legislative action is required at this time.


108.PROJECT:Rawlins Water Supply
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:City of Rawlins
LOCATION:Carbon County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 10 1994 I $250,000   1996
Level II 46 1997 I $120,000   1998
Level III 38 1998 II $3,810,000* 2002
Level III 88 2002 II   2005
*60% grant

PROJECT INFORMATION:
In 1996, the City of Rawlins requested a Level II study to evaluate possible improvements to their Sage Creek spring collector system, the Fort Steele pipeline, and the water treatment plant. The Ft. Steele line is in poor condition, badly corroded, and is nearly unusable. The city has experienced taste and odor problems during summer months and has asked the Farm Loan Board to fund additional development of the springs on Sage Creek. It appears the algae growth in the reservoir in conjunction with the existing treatment process has resulted in unacceptable water quality. Level II funding was provided by the Wyoming legislature in 1997. The study was completed in the spring of 1998.

A preliminary report prepared by the consultant recommended expansion of the spring collection field, replacement of a wood stave transmission line in the spring field, replacement and relocation of the Platte River diversion, replacement and relocation of the Platte River water supply raw water transmission main, and major water treatment plant improvements. The preliminary Level II study concludes that these improvements will provide Rawlins with a reliable water supply for the next 25 years.

Expansion of the spring collector field alone is insufficient to provide adequate water to Rawlins for the 25 year planning horizon. In order to meet peak day demands, replacement of the pipeline that conveys water from the North Platte River to the city is needed. The proposed new pipeline would follow a more efficient route that will involve a change in the point of diversion. The new alignment will facilitate possible delivery of raw water to outlying subdivisions, potential raw water irrigation of some parks, and delivery of water to the town of Sinclair in emergencies.

Expansion and improvement of the spring field is contemplated at a later date. In addition, there are proposed water treatment plant upgrades that total $3,500,000. The city of Rawlins will fund these improvements with capital facilities tax money and grants/loans from funding agencies other than the WWDC.

In 1998 the city of Rawlins received a 60% grant for replacement of the Ft Steele North Platte pipeline ($6,352,000 total cost). The remaining 40% of the project cost was financed through a capital facilities sales tax that passed on November 4, 1997.

Constructions of improvements to the water treatment were completed in 2001. An engineering contract was awarded in April 1999 for design of the intake diversion, pumping station and transmission line. Design of the new raw water line has been completed and construction is scheduled to be completed by July 2003. Routing of the transmission line will provide raw water to the water treatment plant as well as for irrigation of the new city golf course which is to be located on the east side of the city.

There were substantial project time delays owing to the issuance of a BLM right-of-way use permit, Section 7 consultation pursuant to the Endangered Species Act and a preliminary design realignment owing to issues concerning state highway right-of-ways caused construction to be delayed. Construction of the transmission line was not able to proceed until next August 2002 because of wildlife stipulations, which limited construction activities to between August 1 and November 15th. The 2002 Legislature therefore extended the project reversion date until July 1, 2005.

In October 2002, the City of Rawlins and Town of Sinclair reached an agreement, which will have Sinclair's potable water being provided by the Rawlins drinking water treatment plant. Rawlins will lease "unrestricted water rights" for fifty years on one cubic foot per second, which would then be transferred from Sinclair to Rawlins at the end of the lease period. The Town of Sinclair will be charged $0.84 per thousand gallons of treated water to serve Town residents and the Sinclair Oil Refinery. Sinclair Oil Refinery will continue to obtain its industrial water from the existing Town of Sinclair intake, treatment and transmission line that will be purchased from the Town in the amount of $1.25 million. The Town of Sinclair will use these monies to make needed improvements to the Town's distribution system and to cover the Town's share of a WWDC funded project to construct a storage tank and transmission line west of the Town near the Shark's Tooth Ridge.

The 2003 Legislature authorized extension of the project reversion date and project description to allow construction of a new 2.5-mile 12-inch treated water transmission line to connect the Rawlins water system to the new Sinclair water storage tank. Construction on the treated water transmission line was completed in December 2003.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required.


109.PROJECT:Ray Lake Enlargement
LEVEL:New Application
SPONSOR:Shoshone & Arapaho Tribes
LOCATION:Fremont County
PROGRAM:New Development

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The enlargement of Ray Lake, on the Wind River Reservation, has been a potential project for many years. Designs were completed in 1996 for the project, but funding was not available at that time. When the State Legislature enacted Enrolled Act No. 50, allowing the tribes to sponsor water development projects through the Water Development Commission, Ray Lake Enlargement became a possibility. During the study phases for the Ray Lake project, an environmental assessment was completed, which provided information on impacts and potential benefits.

This level II study project would review the designs and enlargement options, and begin the environmental evaluation process. The coordination process with the tribes and federal agencies would be a key component of the project. Additionally, project permitting, and water rights for the existing reservoir and the enlargement would be issues to be considered.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The Commission recommends that the project be incorporated into the New Development Program at Level II with an appropriation of $100,000.


110.PROJECT:Riverton Raw Water Supply Rehabilitation Project
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:City of Riverton
LOCATION:Fremont County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 46 1997 I $150,000 1998
Level II 81 1999 I $65,000 2000
Level III 2 2001 II $85,000 2005

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
This project proposal came from recommendations described in the WWDC Level II Riverton Water Supply Study completed by Nelson Engineering in June of 2000. The municipal and residential raw water distribution system within the City of Riverton is an offshoot of surrounding agricultural irrigation systems. The responsibility for operations and maintenance of the ditches, pipes, and laterals comprising the system was assumed by the sponsor several years ago. The system serves approximately 200 paying customers ($98.00/user/year), but actual users are estimated to be upwards of 400, and potentially 790 users could be served by an expanded, rehabilitated system.

Preservation and expansion of the system would extend the life-span of the City of Riverton's water treatment plant since the present-day use of the irrigation system is estimated at 400,000 gallons/day. Two laterals that are proposed for rehabilitation are primary laterals for Riverton Valley Irrigation District and LeClair Irrigation District that deliver water to irrigators downstream of the city of Riverton system. The sponsor has retained an engineering firm to design this project. The design should be completed early in 2004.

Due to limited WWDC funds the project received $85,000 in 2001 for design services only. The sponsor is now intending to proceed with construction and they have requested $1,001,500 additional grant funds. This will provide a total of $1,086,500 or 50% of project eligible costs from grant funds with the remaining funds from other sources.

Estimated Level III (Existing)
Phase 1 CostsDesign$ 170,000.00
Includes Surveying, Permitting and Easements
Estimated Level III (Requested)
Phase 2 Costs: (Example)Pipeline$1,446,086.00
Legal (Services provided in-house)$ 0.00
Engineering (8.5%)$ 122,917.00
Contingency (15%)$ 216,916.00
Cost of Funding (RUS, SRF, SLIB)$ 0.00
Multi-Year Construction Inflation (5%/yr)$ 217,000.00
Project Manager ($35k/yr as required)$      N.A.
Total Project Costs$2,172,919.00
   Rounded$2,173,000.00

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be continued in the Rehabilitation Program at Level III with a grant appropriation of $1,001,500.00.


111.PROJECT:Riverton Valley Rehabilitation No. 2-I
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Riverton Valley Irrigation District
LOCATION:Fremont County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 86 2001 II $40,000   2002
Level III 88 2002 II $335,000* 2007
*50% grant

PROJECT INFORMATION:
Flow measurements on the Riverton Valley Canal were conducted as part of the Wind River Basin study. The Riverton Valley open laterals experience high exfiltration as well as high maintenance costs. In 1994, the Commission recommended the project advance in the Rehabilitation Program to Level III status with an appropriation of $350,000. This project addressed twelve laterals under the main canal system. These open canals were replaced by buried pipelines, which greatly reduced maintenance costs and water losses. The district prioritized system repairs and work was completed in four phases from 1995 through the spring of 1999. The district was granted funds to purchase project materials. The district was responsible for all costs related to project design, permit procurement, land procurement, construction engineering and construction of the project. A total of 12 laterals were rehabilitated over a four-year period from 1995 to 1999. The district has realized a 25% increase in delivery efficiency with the improvements made to date.

The Riverton Valley Irrigation District, in an effort to continue their conservation program updated the WWDC Level I Report: by using WWDC funds appropriated by the Legislature to determine the feasibility and practicability of implementing the conservation measures outlined in the Level I Report. The Level II Report recommended the installation of pipe in nine additional open laterals and provided a revised estimate for rehabilitation costs totaling $670,000. The 2002 Legislature appropriated $335,000 for 50% of the project costs to be used for the purchase of materials. Engineering, installation and permitting costs are provided by the district. Design and rehabilitation construction on seven laterals has been completed through the end of 2003. The remaining laterals are scheduled to be completed during 2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required.


112.PROJECT:Riverton Valley Rehabilitation #2, Phase II/Riverton Valley
Underflow Project
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Riverton Valley Irrigation District
LOCATION:Fremont County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 7 2002 II $40,000   2004
Level III 69 2003 II $140,000* 2008
*50% grant: 50% loan, 6%, 25 years

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The district has approached the Commission for Level III construction funds to rehabilitate four underflow structures that were evaluated during a recently completed Level II Study. These 1930's vintage structures handle upstream return flow and flood flow and protect the canal from flood related erosion. The four crossings are in various states of disrepair, with Madden Draw being in the worst condition. This underflow structure has already partially failed (caved in). Additionally, the corrugated metal pipe utilized at these crossings is not sized correctly to handle extreme events. Rehabilitation of these crossings would provide protection to the canal during flood flows and ultimately improve the ability and reliability of the system to deliver water to the users.

The 2003 Legislature authorized Level III construction funding for the project. An engineering consultant has been selected to design the improvements. Construction is scheduled to be completed by the end of 2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required.


113.PROJECT:Rock Springs East Water Supply
LEVEL:II-Hold
SPONSOR:Green River-Rock Springs-Sweetwater County Joint Powers Water Board
LOCATION:Sweetwater County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 8 1995 I $50,000   1996
Level II 15 1996 I Hold   1998
Level II 82 1998 I Hold   2000
Level II 36 2000 I Hold   2002
Level II 7 2002 I Hold* 2004
*A block appropriation of $15,000 was made for all hold projects.

PROJECT INFORMATION:
Several areas east of Rock Springs, including the Arrowhead Springs Subdivisions, are interested in constructing a centralized water system. In order to supply water to the area, a new transmission pipeline would be required to transmit water from Rock Springs.

SF Industries may be interested in participating in the project. Further, the Sweetwater County Airport, located 7 miles east of Rock Springs, would also like water service.

The Level I study delineated a service area and provided preliminary designs and cost estimates for the pipeline.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC is recommending that the project remain on Level II-Hold status.


114.PROJECT:Saratoga Storage Standpipe Rehabilitation
LEVEL:Level II
SPONSOR:Town of Saratoga and Carbon County Impact JPB
LOCATION:Carbon County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 7 2002 II $60,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The water system for the Town of Saratoga is a shared operation between the town and the Carbon County Impact Joint Powers Board. The town operates, maintains and administers the day-to-day functions of the water system. The board owns and maintains capital improvements made to the water system.

The proposed project is the rehabilitation of a 1 million gallon welded steel storage standpipe that was constructed in 1978. The standpipe and foundation are in good condition, but the standpipe is in need of rehabilitation to extend its useful life, to bring it into compliance with OSHA requirements, and to protect the original investment. The standpipe paint contains lead and appropriate lead abatement and disposal procedures will be followed.

The standpipe was inspected and videotaped by divers in April 2000. The videotapes show numerous deficiencies including blistered and peeled paint, corrosion at failed paint areas, accumulated sediment, inoperable corrosion protection system, and missing and damaged overflow pipe supports. The standpipe exterior paint is chipped and peeling. Previously it was not practical to take this standpipe out of service for an extended period to perform maintenance and/or repairs, since it was the only storage facility. The standpipe was Saratoga's only water storage facility from 1978 until a second standpipe was completed in 2001. The second standpipe allows a redundancy in the system, so repairs and maintenance can be completed as needed. The major work items for the rehabilitation include: stair and railing modifications, relocation of overflow piping, sandblasting and painting the interior, cleaning and painting the exterior, and installing a cathodic protection system.

     CHAPTER X Estimated Level III Costs
     CHAPTER XI Phase 1 Costs
Plans, Specifications and Other$37,620
     CHAPTER XII Phase 2 Costs
Mobilization$11,000
Concrete Foundation Repairs$3,300
Stair and Railing Modifications$16,500
Overflow Relocation$22,000
Miscellaneous Metal Fabrication$4,400
Sandblast and Paint Interior$74,800
Caulk Roof Plate Joints$3,300
Clean and Paint Exterior$54,000
Electrical and Cable Rerouting$4,400
Cathodic Protection System$22,000
Site Grading$5,500
Lead Abatement and Waste Disposal$55,000
Engineering (10%)$31,382
Contingency (15%)$51,780
Total Project Cost$396,982
Rounded$400,000

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends that the project be incorporated into the Rehabilitation Program at Level III with an appropriation of $200,000. The Sponsor will provide the remaining $200,000.


115.PROJECT:Saratoga Test Well (Saratoga Master Plan)
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:Town of Saratoga, Carbon County Impact Joint Powers Board
LOCATION:Carbon County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 7 2002 I $60,000 2002
Level II 125 2003 I $180,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The 2002 Saratoga Level I Study recommended two (2) sites for test drilling in order to determine viability of a ground water source of supply to replace or subordinate the town's existing North Platte diversion and treatment facility. A test well drilled in 2003 at the proposed site, 2 miles ENE of town on BLM lands, proved to be deficient based on desired yields of at least 300 gpm (test well apparently pumped efficiently at a rate of 75-100 gpm). Pump testing results however, revealed good aquifer conductivity potential in the North Park Formation aquifer.

The sponsor is requesting additional Level II funding to continue the ground water supply testing program. The increased project budget will provide for 3 additional pilot test wells, a production-size test well, evaluation of the sites for engineering/economic feasibility, and permitting.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be continued in the New Development Program at Level II with an appropriation of $160,000.


116.PROJECT:Sheridan Big Goose Water Supply
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:City of Sheridan
LOCATION:Sheridan County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 82 1998 I $75,000 2000
Level III 96 2000 I $1,587,000 2004
Level III 88 2002 I $297,000 2004
Level III 69 2003 I $407,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The water supply system for the Sheridan area is jointly operated by the Sheridan Area Water System Joint Powers Board (SAWSJPB) and the city of Sheridan. Water is diverted by the City of Sheridan and then conveyed to treatment facilities for the SAWSJPB and the City. During peak demand or when turbid water conditions exist the diversion and presedimentation facilities cannot meet the system demand. The level II study determined that expansion of the facility was required.

The WWDC contracted with MSE-HKM to conduct the Level II analysis. The Level II analysis recommended improvements and expansion of the existing diversion facilities from Big Goose Creek. The city was granted funding for these improvements during the 2000 Legislative Session.

A consultant was retained for design and construction engineering. Due to the complexity of the project, the initial cost estimates were found to be insufficient to allow the project to proceed to construction. The City requested additional funding in 2002 of $297,000 to cover the increase in the cost estimate.

During the summer of 2002 the City of Sheridan proceeded to the bidding phase of this project. When the bids were received it again became apparent that the Engineering cost estimates did not accurately reflect the cost to construct the project. The bids that were received were in excess of project funding by approximately $814,000. The City of Sheridan was able to temporarily provide enough money to award the bid. A change order was drafted, which removed several items from the construction contract until such a time that additional funding could be obtained to add the previously removed items back into the contract. The City of Sheridan requested in 2003 an additional $407,000 to cover 50% of the project overrun. Work on the project has been steady through 2003 and is scheduled to be completed in 2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action required at this time.


117.PROJECT:Sheridan Pipeline Rehabilitation (Sheridan Hydro Power)
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:City of Sheridan
LOCATION:Sheridan County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 7 2002 I $50,000.00 2004
Level III 69 2003 II $5,184,00.00 2008

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Sheridan Hydro Power / Sheridan Pipeline Rehabilitation Level II project identified some corrosion problems in the 16" transmission line. Funding was requested to replace this 16" line with a new 20" line. Additionally the city of Sheridan requested funding for two shorter transmission lines in the South Hills area. The need for the smaller transmission lines in the South Hills area was urgent enough that the City of Sheridan requested that they be split out of the larger project and constructed as soon as possible. Their request was granted and the design of the South Hills pipelines is progressing at a rapid rate.

In the mean time the design of the larger 20" line is also underway and progressing at a steady pace. Construction of the South Hills lines will likely begin next spring. The 20" line will follow the construction of the South Hills lines with construction beginning in the Summer of 2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action required at this time.


118.PROJECT:Shoshone Drop Structures
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Shoshone Irrigation District
LOCATION:Park
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level III 88 2002 II $570,000* 2007
*100% grant for invoiced materials. The sponsor is responsible for all other project costs.

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Shoshone ID would like to continue the rehabilitation on the drop structures on the Garland Canal. This is a large-scale project involving 4 drop structures and a drop structure combined with a diversion. Also included are the control works on the Ralston Reservoir and the conversion of approximately 1.5 miles of open ditch to a pressurized pipeline.

The district installed the pressurized pipeline and constructed Garland Canal Drop #3 during the winter of 2002-2003. The district is constructing Garland Canal Drops #4 and #5 during the winter of 2003-2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No Legislative action required.


119.PROJECT:Shoshone Utilities Ground Water Development
LEVEL:New Application
SPONSOR:Joint Business Council of the Eastern Shoshone and Northern Arapaho Tribes
LOCATION:Fremont County
PROGRAM:New Development

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
The Fort Washakie and Boulder Flats water systems (operated by the Shoshone Utility Organization) relies solely upon highly variable (both in quantity and quality) surface water diverted from the Little Wind River. Low flows due to irrigation demands in the summer and natural low flows in the winter often leave Shoshone Utilities unable to divert enough water to meet domestic water needs. High turbidities during runoff and after the South Fork II fire (June 2002) have also caused significant problems for Shoshone Utilities, reinforcing the need for a reliable ground water source of domestic water

WWDC funding is requested to further investigate the feasibility of developing available ground water resources, identify potential drilling sites, estimate drilling budgets, and develop a Master Plan for Shoshone Utilities regarding a ground water supplemented system.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be incorporated into the New Development Program at Level II with an appropriation of $850,000.


120.PROJECT:Sidon Bitter Creek Crossing
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Sidon Irrigation District
LOCATION:Big Horn County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 74 1993 II $75,000   1995
Level III 206 1995 II $1,000,000   1998
Level III 88 2002 II $217,000* 2007
*50% grant, 50% loan, (6%, 10 years)

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
The Level II rehabilitation plan written by Inberg-Miller Engineers, Inc. in 1994 identified several locations on the Sidon Canal needing attention. One of these locations was the Bitter Creek crossing. The replacement structure will be sized to carry 2 cfs per 70 acres for the irrigation district, plus pass a flood event on Bitter Creek. This crossing must be conservatively sized because it is very near the diversion from the Shoshone River and essentially all of the users in the Sidon Irrigation District are below the structure. The structure also serves as a diversion dam for the Sidon Canal diversion from Bitter Creek. If the structure would fail or wash out from a flood on Bitter Creek, the district would not be able to deliver water to its users.

The structure is under construction and will be complete prior to the 2004 irrigation season.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action required.


121.PROJECT:Sinclair Water Supply
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Town of Sinclair
LOCATION:Carbon County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 10 1994 I $250,000 1996
Level II 15 1996 I Hold 1998
Level II 82 1998 I Hold 2000
Level II 81 1999 I $50,000 2000
Level III 88 2002 I $672,500 2007

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Town of Sinclair is an incorporated municipality with a population of 500. The town and the Sinclair Refinery share a common water system. The water treatment and distribution system for the town is operated by the refinery. The town has identified several deficiencies in their supply and distribution system. The existing 75,000 gallon tank was constructed in 1924 and is badly corroded. In 1993, the town requested funding for a water supply master plan to evaluate the entire water system that was constructed seven decades ago.

A Level I master plan water supply study was completed by the WWDC in 1996. This study indicated that the treatment plant, tank and transmission and distribution lines need to be upgraded. The town and refinery have an agreement for the operation and maintenance of the water system. The town owns the water right. For the use of 90% of the water, the refinery annually pays up to $15,000 for operation and maintenance of the water system. The water system consists of a pretreatment unit which is located at the river. The water is run through a final treatment plant that purifies the water. Most of the refinery's wateruse does not need to be potable.

The Level II Study was completed in July 2001. Prior to completion however, lengthy negotiations occurred between the town, the refinery, and the EPA (The Town was under EPA Administrative Order procedures for exceeding turbidity standards). Ultimately, the refinery and town agreed to upgrade the North Platte River treatment plant to meet EPA primary drinking water standards. The town's responsibility is to pursue improvements including increased storage, a new transmission line, distribution system upgrades, and the installation of a 0.5 MGD treatment (filtration/disinfection) facility to provide resident drinking water.

The town has subsequently entered into an agreement with the City of Rawlins to provide a regional water supply system, which will allow the Town of Sinclair to forego its need for water treatment plant improvements. The Town of Sinclair's project has been designed and construction of the transmission pipeline and storage facility located west of town will be completed in the winter of 2003. The City of Rawlins is constructing the remainder of the transmission pipeline from Rawlins to Sinclair's new storage tank.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action required.


122.PROJECT:Sleepy Hollow Pipeline
LEVEL:New Application
SPONSOR:Central Campbell County Improvement & Service District
LOCATION:Campbell County
PROGRAM:New Development

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
Central Campbell County Improvement & Service District (CCCI&SD) is in the process of adding another well (funded via WWDC Ground Water Exploration Grant Program) to their existing public water supply system. User demand for the district has been increasing. As a result the current water production is barely meets demands and does not allow for emergencies or peak use.

Once the new well is complete (spring of 2004), CCCI&SD will need a transmission line from the new well to the upper tank. The transmission line can be constructed on existing easements, rights-of-way, and lands owned by the District or by the Sleepy Hollow Homeowners Association. Also, plumbing and metering connections will need to be made to the existing upper tank. The well will require a pump, motor, and controls at the well site. Control equipment must be compatible with the existing control system.

Estimated Level III
Costs:Pipeline$180,250
Upper Tank Connection$ 18,000
Well Pump & Motor$ 14,000
Controls, Electrical, Meter$ 13,500
Paving, Sidewalk, Landscaping, Reclamation$ 102,750
Engineering (10%)$ 32,850
Contingency (10%)$ 36,135
 
Total Project Costs$ 397,485
Rounded$ 400,000

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be incorporated into the New Development Program at Level III with an appropriation of $200,000.


123.PROJECT:Small Water Project Program
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:State
LOCATION:Statewide
PROGRAM:New Development/Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Small Projects 88 2002 I & II $1,000,000 N/A

PROJECT INFORMATION:
Small water projects have or may be capable of providing multiple benefits for a total estimated cost of less than $50,000. Projects may include small reservoirs, pipelines, wells, windmills, springs and wetland developments. These small projects may provide habitat and water for fish and wildlife, increase recreational opportunities, provide water for maintenance of the integrity and vitality of plant and animal communities, serve as instruments to improve rangeland condition and make beneficial use of water. Following is a listing of projects approved in 2003:

Account I - New DevelopmentAccount II - Rehabilitation
Diamond S Ranch PipelineRussell Ranch Pipeline
Central WellDiamond S Ranch Well
Big Bend Pasture WellBig Sandy Pipeline
Emigrant/Four Mile PitsCoyote Reservoirs
Perino PipelineCabin Creek Water Development
Gooseberry Creek Ranch WellTY Ranch Pipeline
Big Horn River Ranch PipelineOld Steve Adams Duck Pond
East Dry Creek #1 WellPoison Buttes/Cottonwood Ponds
Crowfoot Ranch WellJones Water Project
Jensen Wash WellDixon Summer Project
Migration WellCroonberg Water Development
Asperation WellTwelve Mile Sink Well
Bad Land WellLombard Well
Blue Forest WellEmigrant Well
Gasson Well #2
Four Mile Gulch Well
Bench Well

The WWDC Small Water Project Program provides a valuable incentive tool that addresses multiple use water developments with established public benefits. This program has limited history, yet as is demonstrated by the above listing of approved project activity, has generated considerable interest.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends an additional appropriation of $1,500,000; 50% or $750,000 from Account I and 50% or $750,000 from Account II.


124.PROJECT:Smiths Fork Dam
LEVEL:II-Hold
SPONSOR:State of Wyoming
LOCATION:Lincoln County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 10 1994 I Hold   1996
Level II 15 1996 I Hold   1998
Level II 82 1998 I Hold   2000
Level II 36 2000 I Hold   2002
Level II 7 2002 I Hold* 2004
*A block appropriation of $15,000 was made for all hold projects.

PROJECT INFORMATION:
In 1984, the States of Wyoming, Utah and Idaho joined forces to evaluate the potential to construct storage on the Smiths Fork of the Bear River, which would provide benefits to all three states. The project would provide a reliable water supply, and generate electricity.

The project would also improve water quality and provide flood control and recreation benefits. In 1986, the State of Utah prepared an economic feasibility report which concluded that the project was economically feasible only if all three states participated in financing the project.

The project could provide flood control, recreation, hydropower, and supplemental irrigation water supply benefits to Wyoming water users and the public. Presently, the tri-state Smiths Fork project appears to be the most economical means to develop the Cokeville and Cokeville Development Association's storage allocation of 14,520 acre-feet. Therefore, the WWDC has included the Smiths Fork among its candidates for state projects to be pursued when the states of Utah and Idaho are able to obtain their share of required project funding.

In 1988, the U.S. Corps of Engineers (COE) prepared a development plan for the entire Bear River. The report was completed in 1989. Several options were identified. The report verified that a dam on the Smiths Fork would provide considerable flood control, storage and water quality benefits. However, the economic assessment concluded that the project had an unfavorable benefit-cost ratio and, therefore, would not be eligible for federal funding under existing criteria. The project is presently on hold status in the New Development Program.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends that the project be retained at Level II-Hold status.


125.PROJECT:Smiths Fork Flumes
LEVEL:Level III
SPONSOR:Smiths Fork Irrigation District
LOCATION:Lincoln county
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level III 69 2003 II $ 15,000 2008

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Smiths Fork Irrigation District is being required by the State Engineer's Office to provide better measurement of the diversion of water into their system. As a result they asked the WWDC's help in purchasing three flumes. The flumes will be installed at the head of the Covey Canal, in Burner Creek, and in Spring Creek. The district will provide the engineering, permitting, and installation required for this project.

To date, two of the flumes have been installed. The third flume was installed but plugged by local enterprising beavers. Consequently the final flume must be reevaluated and placed a second time.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No action is needed.


126.PROJECT:South Garden Creek Water Supply
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:Central Wyoming Regional Water System Joint Powers Board
LOCATION:Natrona County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 7 2002 I $100,000 2004
Level II 125 2003 I $100,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Central Wyoming Regional Water System Joint Powers Board, in coordination with the City of Casper, sponsored a Level II Feasibility Study to continue the examination of the area south of Casper (and alongside Casper Mountain). This area is populated with approximately 300 residences (of varying age) and each having an individual well. During recent periods of drought, some wells have gone dry, forcing occupants to haul water. The completed Level I Study looked at the potential of adding this area to the City of Casper's public water supply system. Five unique service areas were identified in the Level I Study, including: Squaw Creek/Wolf Creek, South Garden Creek, Elkhorn Valley, Coates Road and Pursel Lands. While the later two areas were advanced to Level III construction status during the 2003 Legislative Session, Squaw Creek/Wolf Creek, South Garden Creek, and Elkhorn Valley required additional study. A Level II Feasibility Study was approved during this same session which would further define the water supply options of these service areas (excluding ground water), refine the entity boundaries, and include an environmental assessment. The final report for this study is due June 2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required.


127.PROJECT:State Stream Gage System
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:State Engineer's Office
LOCATION:Statewide
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 59 1996 I $200,000 None
Level II 82 1998 I $200,000 2000
Level II 36 2000 I $200,000 2002

PROJECT INFORMATION:
In 1996, $200,000 was appropriated from Water Development Account 2 for Wyoming stream gage rehabilitation and construction. The Bureau of Reclamation and the USGS also appropriated monies for work on these Wyoming stream gages. The improvements have been made and all but $14,346.18 of the funds have been expended.

In 1998, a second $200,000 was appropriated for stream gage rehabilitation. However, the SEO did not undertake any stream gage rehabilitation measures during FY 98-99 and the $200,000 reverted back to Water Development Accounts.

In 2000, a third $200,000 was appropriated from Water Development Account II for Wyoming stream gage rehabilitation and construction for FY 00-01.

In 2002, $14,346.18 remained in the 1996 appropriation and $45,970.24 remained in the 2000 appropriation. Both appropriations were extended to 2003.

In 2003, $9,200.30 remained in the 1996 appropriation and $27,843.71 remained in the 2000 appropriation. Both appropriations were extended to 2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required.


128.PROJECT:State Water Plan
LEVEL:I
SPONSOR:State of Wyoming
LOCATION:Statewide
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
State Plan 1 1996 N/A N/A 1996
Aerial Photo. 1 1996 I $250,000 1998
State Plan 46 1997 I $250,000 1998
Basin Plan* 30 1998 I $250,000 2000
State Water Planning Process 81 1999 I $1,435,000 2001
State Water Planning Process 36 2000 I $800,000 2002
State Water Planning Process 86 2001 I $1,550,000 2003
State Water Planning Process 125 2003 I $600,000 2006
*Contained in Agency Budget

PROJECT INFORMATION:
In 1996, the Wyoming Legislature directed the Wyoming Water Development Commission (WWDC) and the State Engineer's Office (SEO) to develop a proposal for updating the state's Framework Water Plan, which was written in the early 1970's and published in 1973. WWDC and the SEO prepared and submitted the proposal to the Governor and the Select Water Committee in October of 1996.

During the 1997 Legislative Session, $250,000 was appropriated from Water Development Account I to enable the WWDC to conduct a feasibility study to determine the costs and methods of implementing a new water planning process for the state. The feasibility study concluded that a descriptive plan for each of the seven major river basins would be provided and would include a statewide computer database that will be updated as conditions change.

During 1997 and 1998, the WWDC undertook a pilot Basin Plan in the Bear River Basin to test data collection methods and procedures, to test information dissemination methods, presentation methods, etc. A coordination process was developed to present information on the proposed Statewide Water Planning Process, and to obtain input from interested parties.

Following authorization by the 1999 Legislature, the Water Development Commission, in July 1999, formally established a River Basin Planning section to implement the Statewide Water Planning Process. The first two River Basin Plans were initiated in the Green and Bear River Basins. Consultants were selected to prepare these basin plans, and a coordination process was implemented to gain input from individuals, private interest groups, and local, state, and federal agencies. The Bear River Basin Plan was completed in November 2000, and the Green River Basin Plan was completed in January 2001. Products of the Statewide Water Planning Process are published on the Water Planning website at: http://waterplan.state.wy.us.

The 2000 Legislature authorized river basin plans to be prepared for the Powder/Tongue and Northeast Wyoming River Basins. Basin Advisory Groups were formed in those basins, and the consultant completed those plans in January 2002.

The 2001 Legislature authorized river basin plans to be prepared for the Wind/Bighorn and Snake/Salt River Basins. Basin Advisory Groups were formed in those basins, and the consultants completed those plans in early 2003.

The 2003 Legislature authorized the river basin plan to be prepared for the Platte River Basin. A Basin Advisory Group has been formed in this basin and the consultant is preparing the plan, with those reports scheduled for completion in April 2005.

Following the completion of the Platte River Basin Plan, development of the Framework Water Plan will be initiated. The Framework Plan will be a summary of the seven river basin plans. Upon completion of the Framework Plan the process of updating the seven basin plans will be initiated, with updates performed on approximately five-year intervals, as was originally proposed with the initiation of the River Basin Planning Program in 1999.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required.


129.PROJECT:Story Well Acquisition
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Story Fire District
LOCATION:Sheridan County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 86 2001 I $24,000 2002
Level III 69 2003 I *  
*Sale of well to the sponsor.

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Story Fire District is a Sheridan County fire district that has been in existence since 1952. The district provides fire protection to Story and the southern portion of the county south of Meade Creek. The district's ability to effectively respond to fire emergencies is limited due to a lack of a central, reliable year round water supply. In the winter months, the only reliable supply is from the Story Fish Hatchery, which is not centrally located. A central location is critical for response time. Other sources are iced over in the water.

The district is planning upgrades by moving its base of operation to a new fire station and by replacing out-dated equipment. In addition, the district board wishes to improve the ISO (Insurance Services Office) rating for the district from its present rating of 9 to a rating of 7. WWDC funding was requested for test drilling for development of a ground water supply that is nearby and reliable in winter months. A test well was drilled and pump-tested in June/July of 2002 by WWDC at the district's new fire station site. Legislation was granted during the 2003 session to transfer the well to the fire district. Legal documents have been prepared to transfer the ownership of the well to the Story Fire District. The documents were sent to the district for their review in July of 2003 and no response has been received from the district. Follow up phone calls have not been successful in getting the districts approval to proceed forward at this time.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action required at this time.


130.PROJECT:Sunset Pipeline
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:Sunset Water District
LOCATION:Weston County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 125 2003 I $75,000 2004

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
The 2003 WWDC Level II Canyon-Sunset Water Supply Study recommended tying Sunset Water District to the City of Newcastle water supply system. Specifically, a connection to Newcastle's No. 3 Tank North of town then 10,500 feet of 8" transmission line to the Sunset Water District distribution system.

Estimated Level III
Phase 1 Costs:Design$ 35,095
Estimated Level III
Phase 2 Costs:Bonds & Mobilization$ 25, 221
Pipeline$189,000
Vault & Meter$ 20,000
PRV & Vault$ 10,000
Misc. Connections and Piping$ 23,600
Seeding, Road Surfacing$ 9,610
Permitting$ 3,510
Easements$ 20,000
Legal$ 3,510
Engineering (10%)$ 27,743
Contingency (15%)$ 45,776
Cost of Funding (RUS, SRF, SLIB)$ 10,500
     Total Project Costs$ 423,565
          Rounded$ 425,000

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be incorporated into the New Development Program at Level III with an appropriation of $212,500 (50% Grant).


131.PROJECT:Ten Sleep Water Supply
LEVEL:Level II
SPONSOR:Town of Ten Sleep, Incorporated Municipality
LOCATION:Washakie County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 7 2002 I $75,000 2004
Level II 125 2003 I $80,000 2004

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
The Town of Ten Sleep has two (2) Madison Formation aquifer supply wells that serve its water supply needs. The oldest well was drilled in 1955 and the second well was added in 1978. The total yield from these source wells (1350 gpm flowing at surface) has been more than ample to serve the community. Consumption however, far outstrips demand, with average use estimated at 2500 gallons per day per person. This use rate figure is approximately ten times the general design considerations suggested for Wyoming public water supply systems by the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality Water Quality Division Rules and Regulations (WDEQWQD Chapter XII, Section 8). This inefficiency is a central consideration to be addressed by the requested study. At task in the study would be an entire review of the system from an evaluation of source supply performance (Ten Sleep #1 Well and Ten Sleep #2 Well) to an appraisal of the transmission and distribution system.

A significant desire for a Level II, as in the Level I study, is provided by potential rural users who could be served by the town's supply. Expansion of supply outside of town has occurred to some extent but recent residential development in the county near Ten Sleep has encountered insufficient water supply in their domestic wells from a quantity and quality standpoint. Installing deep wells is not an option for these residents who are at close proximity (within 2 to 3 miles) to the town.

A draft Level II study was delivered in November 2003 and the town plans, in the near term, to pursue recommended distribution system upgrades.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No Legislative action required.


132.PROJECT:Torrington Raw Water
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:City Of Torrington
LOCATION:Goshen County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level III 88 2002 I $96,000* 2007
*50% grant

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The proposed project includes installation of three non-potable ground water wells to supply water for irrigation of three large lawn areas within the city. One well would water the city park (1.71 acres) and would improve fire protection at the fire hall and shop area by providing water for storage. The second well would provide raw irrigation water for Trail Elementary School (8.42 acres). The third well would provide water for the Middle School complex (12.88 acres).

The City of Torrington is under an Administrative Order from EPA to treat drinking water to meet nitrate standards. They currently have four reverse osmosis units operating to comply with the order. Operation of these units is costly and creates problems with the concentrate (waste) handling. To reduce costs and waste disposal problems, the city has initiated a raw water irrigation program. During 2001, five large lawn areas within the city were connected to non-potable water wells for irrigation. This work was funded through a capital facilities tax. The current proposed project would remove three more large lawn areas from the drinking water system and help reduce the cost of running the reverse osmosis treatment units. In addition, it would reduce the amount of wastewater concentrate generated. Reducing the cost and wastes will allow the city time to further plan and develop its drinking water system. The project has been estimated to cost $192,000. The City has requested a 50% grant and will fund the remaining 50% with local funds.

The Trail Elementary School area and the Middle School area improvements are under construction. Project funding was not adequate to award construction of the City Park improvements. The sponsor chose not to seek additional WWDC funds to match with local resources. The work under construction should be complete by late spring 2004.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required.


133.PROJECT:Torrington Water Supply
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:City of Torrington
LOCATION:Goshen County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 8 1995 I $100,000   1996
Level I 15 1996 I $150,000   1998
Level III 38 1998 I $4,500,000* 2002
Level III 88 2002 I   2007
*60% grant, 40% loan (7.25%, 30 years)

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The city of Torrington received financing from the 1998 legislature to complete a new municipal well field and bring the water into the town's distribution system. Initially it was anticipated that loan funds would be offset by financing from RUS, however during the last few months of 2003 SRF loan funds were used in lieu of either WWDC loan funds or RUS funds.

The purpose of the project is to replace older high nitrate wells with new wells located closer to the North Platte River, which are expected to be lower in nitrates. This approach has been used successfully in other communities in the region. Project components include wells, pumps, electrical service, control and disinfection facilities, telemetry, booster pumps, pipe, and appurtenances.

The sponsor has explored groundwater at two locations. The first site had insufficient aquifer thickness and the second site had uranium concentrations in excess of drinking water standards. Independent of this funding, the city has installed reverse osmosis treatment units on four wells in the city. This action was necessary to comply with an EPA administrative order. Ownership of treatment units coupled with the inability to find groundwater that meets all drinking water standards has resulted in a shift in the project to seek relatively good quality water closer to the city in an effort to reduce pipeline and related capital costs and operationally to reduce but not eliminate treatment.

Wells have been drilled near the municipal golf course. Design of the pumps, controls, transmission pipelines, and telemetry system are underway. Construction of some components is anticipated in 2004. Depending upon the coordination of the supply water components financed by WWDC and SRF, and the treatment water components financed by others (possibly SRF), the project is anticipated to be complete in 2005 or 2006.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action required.


134.PROJECT:Turnerville Water Supply
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:Turnerville Water & Sewer District
LOCATION:Lincoln County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 15 1996 I $250,000** 1998
**The Turnerville study was included in a regional study, which incorporated the Town of Thayne, Bedford Water & Sewer District, and the Willow Creek Pipeline Company (now known as the Turnerville Water & Sewer District)

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The community of Turnerville was identified as having serious problems with their water supply, transmission and distribution systems during a WWDC Level II study conducted in 1998. Turnerville has formed a water district and is anxious to utilize WWDC funding to rehabilitate and repair the existing system. The District would like to renovate the Willow Canyon spring and lay almost four miles of six and eight inch piping. In addition, the District would like to construct a 250,000 gallon buried concrete storage tank.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be incorporated into the New Development Program at Level III with an appropriation of $587,750 to fund 50% of the cost of eligible components. The balance of funding needed for construction will come from other sources.


135.PROJECT:University of Wyoming Research
LEVEL:I
SPONSOR:State of Wyoming
LOCATION:Statewide
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 30 1998 I $41,584 2000
Level I 36 2000 I $140,000 2002
Level I 86 2001 II $140,000 2002
Level I 7 2002 I $200,000 2004
Level I 125 2003 I $200,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
Dr. Larry Pochop, College of Engineering professor, is the principal investigator in charge of water related research at the University of Wyoming. The research, conducted under Dr. Pochop's leadership, is being provided through a cooperative partnership. Participants include state natural resource agencies and the United States Geological Survey (USGS).

The WWDC, the State Engineer's Office, and other agencies present Dr. Pochop and a Selection Committee, formed from several state and federal governmental agencies, with several research topics each year. These topics cover water related subjects in need of research. The Committee then selects the projects to receive the program funding for the upcoming year.

Funding is being provided primarily by the Wyoming Water Development Commission and the USGS. The Water Development Commission provides approximately $2 to every $1 provided by the USGS. Other state agencies have provided labor or "in kind" research activities to leverage the USGS funds.

In year 2000, the legislature appropriated $140,000 to match available USGS funds. These fund were used on the USGS year 2001 program. This program included administration, four ongoing projects and three new projects.

In year 2001, the legislature appropriated $140,000 to match available USGS funds. These funds were used on the USGS year 2002 program. This program included administration, four ongoing projects and three new projects.

In year 2002, the USGS revised their program and increased their match. Therefore, the legislature was asked to appropriate $200,000 in 2002 to continue to develop water related research in cooperation with the USGS year 2003 program. This program included three ongoing projects and four new projects.

In year 2003, the legislature appropriated $200,000 to match available USGS funds. These funds will be used on the USGS year 2004 program.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The Commission recommends that the project be incorporated in the New Development Program at Level I with an appropriation of $200,000. The WWDC anticipates yearly appropriations for the upcoming years for continuation to these research projects.


136.PROJECT:Viva Naughton Dam Enlargement
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:City of Kemmerer
LOCATION:Lincoln County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level II 10 1994 I Hold   1996
Level II 15 1996 I Hold   1998
Level II 82 1998 I Hold   2000
Level II 36 2000 I Hold* 2002
Level II 7 2002 I 300,000   2004
*A block appropriation of $15,000 was made for all hold projects

PROJECT INFORMATION:
Recent investigations completed for the Green River Groundwater Recharge and Alternate Storage Study indicate enlarging Viva Naughton Reservoir is one of the more efficient water development projects in the state. The reservoir has an existing capacity of 42,393 acre-feet. Pacificorp has filed a water right application for an additional 39,502 acre-feet of storage. The existing reservoir is owned and operated by Scottish Power who has expressed an interest in the further investigation of the potential enlargement of Viva Naughton. The permitted enlargement reserves 10,752 acre-feet for irrigation on the Hams Fork downstream of the dam. During most years irrigators and municipalities depend on the releases from Viva Naughton, Scottish Power, however, has no obligation to continue this practice. The drought of 2002 required Scottish Power to shut the reservoir off to all demands in addition to those required for electrical power generation. As a result, downstream users found the flows in the Hams Fork to be critically low.

The Town of Kemmerer is also interest in participating in the project. The Town of Kemmerer has storage in Kemmerer Reservoir, however the reservoir is not able to pass the required down stream rights through its gates. As a result the reservoir is not used and remains full to allow water to be passed through the spillway. Existing agricultural uses show a need for additional storage on the Hams Fork. The enlargement of Viva Naughton would provide a much needed source of late season water to all uses below the dam including of the Hams Fork Water Users association, and the towns Kemmerer and Diamondville.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action required at this time.


137.PROJECT:Wagner Cherokee Irrigation Rehabilitation
LEVEL:II
SPONSOR:Wagner Cherokee Irrigation District
LOCATION:Carbon County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 7 2002 II $40,000 2004
Level II 125 2003 II $70,000 2004

PROJECT INFORMATION:
A Level II feasibility study is being conducted for the newly formed Wagoner Cherokee Irrigation District to evaluate projects that were recommended in the Level I master plan completed in 2002. Investigations include analysis and design of a single diversion structure on the Encampment River to serve both the Wagoner and Cherokee ditches, evaluation of combining the Wagoner and Cherokee ditches, and determining the best way to prevent seepage loss for the ditches.

The Wagoner Cherokee Irrigation District would like to expand the study and undertake a Phase 2 of the Level II study. The additional work would evaluate rock weir or vain type structures for the diversion. This would require undertaking a geomorphic evaluation of the Encampment River in the vicinity of the diversions and some distance up and down stream. From this evaluation, the cost and practicality of rock structures could be compared to other structure types.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be continued in the Rehabilitation Program at Level II with an appropriation of $35,000.


138.PROJECT:Washakie Rural Water Supply
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Washakie Rural Improvement District
LOCATION:Washakie County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level I 10 1994 I $100,000   1996
Level II 15 1996 I Hold* 1998
Level II 82 1998 I $100,000   2000
Level III 16 1999 I $5,220,000* 2004
Level III 2 2001 I $240,000* 2004
Level III 69 2003 I $3,000,000* 2006
*60% grant, balance of project cost from other sources.

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The project consists of a rural water system extending from the Hot Springs county line on the south, to the Big Horn county line on the north, and encompassing most of the private lands along both sides of the Big Horn River. The new system will obtain its water from the City of Worland, which has an ample supply from two flowing Madison-Bighorn formation wells.

The sponsor's members currently utilize individual wells, which generally exceed EPA regulations for TDS and Sulfates. Some local wells are also high in Sodium, Selenium, and Nitrate. It is estimated that up to 70% of the Sponsor's members haul water or utilize bottled water for domestic use.

The sponsor's project was originally funded in 1999. Due to difficulties with obtaining a water purchase agreement with the City of Worland, preparation of an acceptable design obtaining easements and assessing the impact of the future Big Horn Regional JPB's project, construction of the first phase of this project was not started until May 2001.

Upon placing the Phase I project into service, operational problems surfaced. Subsequently, the engineering consultant's contract was terminated. A new consultant was selected through a competitive qualification based selection process.

After the new consultant began designing the remainder of the sponsor's system, a consultant was selected to design the Big Horn Regional JPB's project. The two consultants worked closely to hydraulically model the Big Horn Regional's northern service area, which includes the sponsor's system. The result of this model is a revised pipeline configuration for the sponsor's system, which saves about $2,000,000, with savings shared by both sponsors.

With these savings and cooperation of the Big Horn Regional JPB, the total budget required for the sponsor's system has been reduced sufficiently that the USDA/Rural Utilities Service has agreed to de-obligate $500,000 of the sponsor's loan. This reduction in loan will reduce the sponsor's yearly loan repayment costs by $34,155. This will make the project more affordable for the water users.

In order to accomplish this loan reduction and insure full use of the existing WWDC's grant, the WWDC's percentage contribution will need to be raised from 60% to 67%. The WWDC grant amount will not be affected.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends that the WWDC's grant participation be increased to an amount not to exceed 67% of the project eligible budget. No additions funds are required.


139.PROJECT:Weather Modification
LEVEL:New Application
SPONSOR:State of Wyoming
LOCATION:Statewide
PROGRAM:New Development

PROJECT INFORMATION:
Area V of the Wyoming Association of Conservation Districts, representing six conservation districts in five counties (Teton, Lincoln, Uinta, Sublette, and Sweetwater) has requested the Water Development Commission conduct a weather modification pilot project in Southwest Wyoming. Additional inquiries for such a pilot project have been received from other areas including the Wind River Basin. The Governor's Drought Task Force has expressed an interest in such activities as well. It should be noted that while active cloud seeding projects are in place in surrounding states, such activity within Wyoming's borders have been minimal over the past twenty years. The Eden Valley Irrigation District, located near Farson, has conducted the majority of such activity and cites an 11 to 13% increase in winter snowpack due to the seeding of appropriate winter storms.

Determination of the exact experimental and control regimes to be employed is critical prior to the initiation of any pilot cloud seeding activities. A study is needed to assess the feasibility of conducting such a cloud seeding program in the given target area(s), with particular attention being paid to the climatology of the region, including storm frequencies and characteristics, barriers, seeding potential, etc. From such information a project design can be developed, including methods and materials, equipment, siting issues, operational criteria, and most importantly, the viability of a meaningful evaluation of project results through monitoring and statistical methods. Hydrologic investigations would also be conducted to estimate increased runoff and associated storage potential. Cost estimates would then be produced along with identification of the potential benefits to be realized, thus approaching a preliminary cost/benefit analysis.

The study will evaluate the cloud seeding potential of the Wind River Range, the successful effects of which could ultimately be felt in both the Green and Wind/Bighorn River Basins. Specifically, the Northern Wind River Range would be investigated so as not to interfere; but rather, augment the activities of the Eden Valley Irrigation District. An additional target pilot area would also be evaluated through this study, that area being that of the water-short Upper North Platte Basin.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be incorporated in the New Development Program at Level II with an appropriation of $100,000.


140.PROJECT:West Side Irrigation NEPA Analysis
LEVEL:New Application
SPONSOR:West Side Irrigation District
LOCATION:Big Horn and Washakie Counties
PROGRAM:New Development

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The West Side Irrigation Project involves converting approximately 16,500 acres of dry Federal land to privately owned irrigated land. The district has an application for a direct flow water right from the Bighorn River recorded with the State Engineer's Office for approximately 16,500 acres.

According to an analysis by Tex Taylor and others at the University of Wyoming, this project will create an additional 200 jobs at an average income of $22,000, with an economic impact of $20 million to the region.

This project has been under consideration for several years with significant studies being conducted by both the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and the Wyoming Water Development Commission. Study expenditures total approximately $450,000 to date. The project was placed on hold more than 10 years ago pending resolution of the Federal land transfer issue. The District has since recently received Congressional approval (U.S. Senate Bill S. 610) authorizing the Secretary of the Interior to transfer the land and sell the land to the District at such time as it has been appraised and the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process have been completed. Specifically, an environmental and cultural study must be completed in order for a fair market value to be placed on the land and the sale completed.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be incorporated in the New Development Program at Level I with an appropriation of $250,000.


141.PROJECT:Wheatland - Black Mountain Water Supply
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Town of Wheatland
LOCATION:Platte County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level III 69 2003 I $100,000* 2008
*50% grant

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Platte County School District No. 1 is building a new middle school complex in the Black Mountain Village area (west of Interstate Highway I-25) in the Town of Wheatland. The West Elementary School is also located in the area. This section of the Town's water system was incapable of meeting the total water supply and fire supply requirements without major improvements. The Town seeks to eliminate this problem by constructing the project in three phases. The 2001 Legislature authorized WWDC grant funding in the amount of $222,000 to construct the first two phases of the project that included a 1 million gallon storage tank, valves, pressure controls and necessary connecting piping to connect the new storage and well to their water system.

The Town requested a 50% grant for financial assistance with the final phase of the project, which includes completion of a third well in the Black Mountain Village area, system connection piping, a pump house and a disinfection system. Total project costs are estimated to be $200,000. The 2003 Legislature authorized a 50% grant for the Level III construction. Engineering design is scheduled to be completed early in 2004, with construction completion by the end of that year.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action is required.


142.PROJECT:Wind River Irrigation Rehabilitation
LEVEL:New Application
SPONSOR:Shoshone & Arapaho Tribes
LOCATION:Fremont County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation

PROJECT INFORMATION:
The Bureau of Indian Affairs operated Wind River Irrigation Project is in very poor shape, with over 50 million dollars in deferred maintenance. According to a 1994 study, over 1,200 structures (60% of the structures) need repair or replacement, and 190 miles of canals and laterals (45%) need repair or reconstruction. Structure failures are common and catastrophic failure of segments of the water delivery system is imminent. In areas the efficiency of the delivery system is 35%.

This appropriation would help fund the first phase of a long-range plan to rehabilitate the system. The tribes are also seeking funds from congress. They are seeking $3.5 million each year for the next three years for the rehabilitation project. The first phase of the project, for which state funds are being sought, will focus on replacing or repairing the most important structures (primarily major canal head gates) with the highest likelihood of failure.

Estimated Level III Costs
State of Wyoming $3,500,000
Federal $3,500,000
TOTAL $7,000,000

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The Commission recommends that the project be incorporated into the Rehabilitation Program at Level III with an appropriation of $3,500,000.


143.PROJECT:Worland Wells Test
LEVEL:New Application
SPONSOR:City of Worland, Incorporated Municipality
LOCATION:Washakie County
PROGRAM:Rehabilitation

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
The City of Worland Well Field (Husky-Worland No. 1 Well and Worland Well No. 3, State Engineer Permit Nos. U.W. 47657, and U.W. 50589, adjudicated for 1,670 gpm and 6,000 gpm respectively) supply to a regional system that may significantly increase demands beyond those presently experience by the City of Worland. The City feels it is imperative that they know the well field potential will not be overtaxed by serving regional demands. Flow testing the wells, will provide critical data regarding their present yield capacities compared to similar data generated when the wells were drilled and tested over 20 years ago. The Worland wells are perhaps the largest flowing artesian well system on the continent and are located on BLM lands. A long-term open flow test poses an array of engineering complexities and will require special permitting from the BLM. The budget proposed will support a feasibility study to specify the best alternative for conducting the test and initiate the permitting process.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
The WWDC recommends the project be incorporated into the Rehabilitation Program at Level II with an appropriation of $40,000.


144.PROJECT:Wright Well and Pipeline
LEVEL:III
SPONSOR:Wright Water & Sewer District
LOCATION:Campbell County
PROGRAM:New Development
  
EXISTING LEGISLATION:
Purpose Chapter Session Account Appropriation Due Date
Level III 88 2002 I $600,000 2007

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
Because of the influx of people in the region due to energy production and construction of two new power plants, Wright Water and Sewer District anticipates water demand in excess of the capacity of the current system. A man camp will be located in the district, which will house as many as 800 to 1,000 workers. The new well contemplated in this application will be necessary to meet the increased water demand. This application is for completion of the well, pump, controls, well house, and a pipeline connecting the well to the distribution system.

Completion is anticipated for a Fort Union well with a large diameter cased section in the top 1200 feet of the well and a smaller diameter cased section in the lower 1500 feet. This project includes funding for the design and construction of 5,700 feet of transmission pipeline and appurtenances.

The anticipated growth has not occurred as quickly as projected and the Town of Wright has temporarily placed this project on hold.

RECOMMENDED LEGISLATIVE ACTION:
No legislative action required.

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